"Newsletter" Aerolatino-Geba
(Aerolatino y todas las Danzas que se practican en Geba)
exclusiva para suscriptores, mié 05 octubre 2005
Reciben esta Newsletter 301 suscriptores

[Paul Kolnik]<br>"Sweet Charity," on Broadway at the Al Hirschfeld Theater.
[Paul Kolnik]
"Sweet Charity," on Broadway at the Al Hirschfeld Theater.

HOLA - Grammy Latino (Alicia Monsalve)

martes, 04 de octubre de 2005 12:40
newsletter

Alicia Monsalve

Hola Augus:
Te envio info para la newsletter
besote
Alicia

Gracias por el aporte Alicia !

Paseando por la web

Mas de los premios Grammy Latino:

El presidente de la Academia Latina de Grabación (GRAMMY) también estuvo presente en las nominaciones
El presidente de la Academia Latina de Grabación (GRAMMY) también estuvo presente en las nominaciones [fuente]

"La sexta edición de los Grammy Latino está programada para el 3 de noviembre en el auditorio Shrine de Los Ángeles y será transmitida por Univisión, por lo cual se hizo presente ayer en el anuncio la portavoz oficial de la cadena Myrka Dellanos.

Por su parte, el presidente de la Academia Latina de la Grabación, Gabriel Abaroa, llamó a la ceremonia de premios una celebración de la mejor música producida en español y portugués.

"Los Grammy Latino son una gran plataforma de exposición para artistas nuevos, pero también un reconocimiento del mejor trabajo. El próximo 3 de noviembre celebraremos a los artistas que dan tanto para ser nominados", dijo el ejecutivo.

El trabajo de los cantautores estuvo reconocido en muchas de las 43 categorías anunciadas ayer y en una en particular: la de Mejor Álbum Cantautor, que debuta este año en la ceremonia. En uno de los rubros más diversos de este año, compiten el brasileño Djavan por Vaidade, el español
Pedro Guerra por Bolsillo, el argentino-estadounidense Kevin Johansen por City Zen, el peruano Gian Marco por Resucitar y el argentino Vicentico por Los Rayos.

El reggaetón, que ha revolucionado la música en español en los últimos meses, domina la categoría de Mejor Álbum de Música Urbana -que este año no incluye a ningún artista de la costa oeste. Tres de las principales figuras del género -los intérpretes puertorriqueños Daddy Yankee y Don Omar y el dúo dominicano Luny Tunes- compiten con el grupo cubano Orishas y el rapero
boricua Vico C.

Además de la falta de dominio de artistas como Juanes y Alejandro Sanz, este año hubo sorpresas, como la poca atención que recibieron algunos discos bien recibidos por la prensa especializada. México en la piel, el esperado álbum con mariachi de Luis Miguel, por ejemplo, sólo obtuvo una nominación y en la categoría de Mejor Álbum Ranchero, que disputa con Pepe Aguilar, Rocío Dúrcal, Vicente Fernández y Ana Gabriel.

Pero casi una docena de artistas recibieron dos nominaciones cada uno, formando una lista que incluye a veteranos como Juan Luis Guerra, Molotov, Carlos Vives e Israel López "Cachao".

google.com

Panorama Histórico de Geba (Dto. de Cultura)

lunes, 03 de octubre de 2005 13:53
Panorama Histórico Socio-Cultural y Deportivo

Dto. de Cultura

Panorama Histórico de Geba (Dto. de Cultura)
Panorama Histórico de Geba (Dto. de Cultura)

Informes 4382-0031/4 (int 165)

Dance in a Doorway

The New York Sun, Mon 03Oct2005
DANCE

The Woman Who Mistook a Door for Her Body

[STEPHANIE BERGER]
FRAMED:
Joanna Halgood performs "Dance in a Doorway" during the Fall for Dance Festival.
STEPHANIE BERGER
FRAMED:
Joanna Halgood performs "Dance in a Doorway" during the Fall for Dance Festival. [fuente]

By AERON KOPRIVA

Some dances catch your eye; others steal your heart. Joanna Haigood’s fanciful, lighthearted, and technically lean “Dance in a Doorway” does both. The short work, which made its New York premiere at the Fall for Dance Festival on Thursday, also tickles the imagination. A whimsical adventure through space, it offers a glimpse of freedom and wonder in the most domestic of settings.

...

daily.nysun.com/Daily/Skins/NY ... n/navigator.asp

Sylvie Guillem and Russell Maliphant at Sadler´s Wells, London

Dance

Push

Sadler's Wells, London

Judith Mackrell
Monday October 3, 2005
The Guardian

[Tristram Kenton]
Edgy, charged chemistry between Russell Maliphant and Sylvie Guillem.
Tristram Kenton
Edgy, charged chemistry between Russell Maliphant and Sylvie Guillem. [fuente]
guardian.co.uk/arts/reviews/st ... 1583611,00.html

Two years ago, when Sylvie Guillem first pitted herself against the hurtling athleticism and liquid stillness of Russell Maliphant's choreography, the effect was transforming. This most elegant of classical ballerinas seemed a new dancer. But if the chemistry is extreme when Guillem is performing Maliphant's choreography, it looks even more striking in this new programme when she's dancing with him. On the ballet stage this could never have happened - Guillem in point shoes would have towered over Maliphant's compact, quiet body. Yet from their first entrance, where Guillem crouches on Maliphant's shoulders then unwinds with flickering grace around him, the affinity between them is charged and immense.

In creating this duet, Maliphant has referenced Guillem's ballerina repertory and there's a classical shape to many of their manoeuvres as they track their slow journey upstage together. Yet there is nothing balletic about the edgy exchange of energy that keeps the movement alive, dangerous and clamorously expressive - so whether Guillem is flying with limbs stretched above Maliphant's head, rolling headlong over his back or turning the relationship back on itself and cradling him in her arms it feels as if their dialogue is inventing itself as it goes along.

There are moments when the danger could be pushed to a more climactic edge - but such is the beauty of these dancers, you could happily watch them doing nothing. If there is a touch of genius it is partly due to lighting designer Michael Hulls who has a gift for gilding, sculpting, polishing and bewitching dance so that it seems to inhabit a world of infinite strangeness and possibility.

Ends tonight. Box office: 0870 737 7737.

guardian.co.uk/arts/reviews/st ... 1583611,00.html

Broadway en Las Vegas

October 2, 2005

Live on the Strip: Broadway's Second City

By JESSE GREEN

LAS VEGAS — The only real problem with the newest Broadway Theater - a $40 million technical marvel featuring 1,200 cushy seats, ample legroom, excellent sightlines and the old-fashioned feeling of a temple, not a hangar - is getting there. For one thing, it's inconvenient to the subway. About 2,500 miles inconvenient.

For another, to reach this Broadway, which opened in August at the Wynn resort here, you have to pass through the gleaming, clanking casino, where doomed souls are chained Bosch-like to one-armed bandits and battalions of high-heeled hostesses dash by with trays of liquid encouragement. By the time you escape the smoky commotion and enter the theater - built for a production of the slacker puppet musical "Avenue Q" - you may welcome the chance to buy a $16 Kahlúa frozen chocolate in a souvenir Wynn glass at the gracious lobby bar. At least you needn't worry about gulping it down before curtain; it's allowed in the house. Indeed, the seats have cup holders.

When the producers of "Avenue Q" announced their decision to forgo the traditional multicity tour in favor of an indefinite run in the bowels of a casino, many theaterati, especially the shut-out road tour bookers, were outraged. Was the Tony-winning pride of Broadway, a New York show if ever there was one, being sent to the desert to be slaughtered? To be cut to 90 minutes, scrubbed of its Bush-bashing and performed by a non-Equity troupe of strippers and Elvises? Even though none of this turned out to be true, the grumblers still worried about the emergence of a crass money-sucking operation even more elaborate than the one long established in New York.

Well, get used to it. Down the same plush Wynn hallway that leads to "Avenue Q" is a door that opens on the site of the forthcoming theater where the Monty Python smash "Spamalot" is scheduled to arrive in 2007. (Further infuriating road bookers, the show will not tour Nevada, Arizona or California.) By then, "Hairspray," with its original stars Harvey Fierstein and Dick Latessa, will have opened at the Luxor; and at the Venetian, a retooled "Phantom of the Opera," with a fancier chandelier, will be ensconced in another new $40 million theater styled to resemble the Paris setting. Meanwhile, the "Mamma Mia!" replicant that pioneered the Broadway-in-Vegas trend in 2003 should be enjoying its fifth Abba-tastic year at the Mandalay Bay. Some resort operators and New York producers say that as many as a dozen more shows - including "Movin' Out" and "Wicked" - are also on their way.

If it isn't already, Las Vegas will soon be the second city of Broadway, home to more New York musicals than any market outside Manhattan. It was this, not just snobbery, behind the "Avenue Q" alarm: the fear of further disruption in an already unstable business. If Broadway shows went to Vegas instead of touring, what would happen to the traditional road theaters and their customers? More saliently, what would happen to their backers, who are often investors in New York productions? If they were outflanked by casino operators, how would that alter the kinds of shows that make it to Broadway in the first place? For even though the tail of touring had to some degree wagged the dog of Broadway for years, Vegas now threatened to clone a new dog entirely. A big dog with sequins.

In short, it seemed that Vegas was becoming more and more a Broadway town while Broadway was becoming more and more a gamble. To those still invested, despite all evidence, in the idea that Broadway had a unique cultural meaning that it selflessly shared with America on the road, the decampment of "Avenue Q" was proof that the Fabulous Invalid was once again dead, and this time its corpse had been stolen. But not only is this an overreaction, it may be missing the point, which is that a factory outlet mall for Broadway could actually be a boon. The goods may be last season's and less than a bargain (top "Avenue Q" seats go for $99 at the Wynn and $96.25 at the Golden in New York) but, hold onto your tap shoes, they may very well be better.

SO shoot me, I preferred "Avenue Q" in Vegas. And it wasn't only because I was stuck in casino-world and thus grateful for the familiar landscape of a New York show. No, the show itself (though the script is mostly unchanged and the cast is made up mostly of newcomers) had improved. In fact, all of the incoming shows may improve, if only because their original creative teams will have had the luxury of time (in the case of "Phantom," 18 years) to tweak or overhaul them. "Avenue Q" is playing at full length, but cutting episodic musicals like "Spamalot" or grandiose ones like "Phantom" to a 90-minute "tab" version (which under the casino contract allows actors to play 10 performances a week, instead of 8, for the same salary) strikes me as a useful challenge. Harold Prince, who staged "Phantom" on Broadway, is lopping a third of it, and even the creators of the tightly constructed "Hairspray" decided that excising two lesser numbers and the intermission would do no harm. As its director, Jack O'Brien, put it, referring to the finale, "You may not be able to stop the beat, but it turns out you can trim it a bit."

There was a time when Mr. O'Brien and Mr. Prince probably wouldn't be caught dead working in Vegas. Although entertainment has been part of the town's makeup from the beginning, its expression was limited to a few familiar forms. Celebrity club acts, topless revues, magicians, impersonators: these were the native fauna, and they were viewed as loss leaders for the gaming industry. But when Steve Wynn installed Siegfried and Roy at the Mirage in 1990, performing a supersized and more theatrical version of their old magic-and-wild-cat routine, something odd began to happen: profit. According to reports, the extravaganza generated $45 million a year until 2003, when it was shut down by a disgruntled cast member.

By then, an even more successful act was colonizing the Strip. Cirque du Soleil, the Montreal-based producer of theatrical spectacles that blend acrobatics, erotics and new-age clowning, opened its first Vegas show, "Mystère," in a custom-designed theater at Treasure Island, another Wynn property, in 1993. It's still running near capacity. Watching the profit mount, several other casinos soon ordered up their own Cirque shows and theaters, each more technically advanced and more expensive than the last. (A spokesman for the MGM Grand said that the latest, "KÀ," cost $165 million to get to Day 1 and millions more thereafter.) The competition was fueled in part by the resort owners' realization that shows could help brand their properties just as effectively as the architectural themes that make the Strip seem like a schizoid stage set. The scramble for branded theatrical entertainment became so fierce that another hit spectacle, "Blue Man Group," was recently seduced from its longtime home at the Luxor when the Venetian whispered promises of a flashier new theater in its cobalt ear.

Musicals seemed the next likely conquest, but what kind? Wheezing bus-and-truck tours on their last legs and a tepid four-year run of "Starlight Express" at the Hilton did not bode well for imported shows. And previous efforts to create home-grown product had failed in one way or another: a Michael Crawford vehicle called "EFX Alive" was a laughingstock but at least it ran; Jerry Herman's "Miss Spectacular," announced every year since sometime last century, never even materialized. Eventually the resort owners, having improbably lured star chefs with the promise of captive consumers, realized that they could do the same thing with theater. Once "Mamma Mia!" demonstrated that a full-length musical could be successful on the Strip - at least if it had already been successful somewhere else - everyone wanted one.

Actually, Mr. Wynn wanted three. To accessorize his eponymous new $2.7 billion resort (he lost his previous Vegas properties in a hostile takeover), he snagged, in addition to "Avenue Q" and "Spamalot," a new Cirque-like spectacular called "Le Rêve" from the former Cirque mastermind Franco Dragone. And for his resort's opening gala in April, he somehow persuaded no less a director than George C. Wolfe to stage the entertainment: a one-night-only club act starring Hugh Jackman.

Money is obviously a major factor in luring Broadway talent and product to Vegas. But so are bodies: nearly 40 million visitors a year, three-quarters of whom attend at least one show during their stay. "Let's look at 'Blue Man Group,' " Robert G. Goldstein, president of the Venetian, said, brandishing a calculator. "We've got 1,800 seats, 10 shows a week, 48 weeks a year. That's 864,000 seats. Figure 85 percent capacity, which is not unrealistic at all. Figure average ticket price of $100. That's $73 million potential gross in a year" - more than six times the show's potential at the Astor Place Theater, where the 300 seats go for $69 each. Even "Wicked," the most consistently sold-out musical on Broadway, can't beat such numbers because it can play only eight shows a week.

As Felix Rappaport, president and chief operating officer of the Luxor, said: "Face it, the financial model here is much better. Broadway, which arguably has the greatest concentration of live entertainment in the country, also has a failure rate of 90 percent."

The comparison with a traditional road tour is even more striking. "What the road seemed to be offering was at most 50 weeks," said Kevin McCollum, a producer of "Avenue Q," "with low guarantees because it wasn't a show about a warm kitten and your grandmother. Plus, they were asking us to change things that make the show what it is." He continued: "Also the size of theater our show works well in, 1,200 seats at most, doesn't exist on the road. Generally they're around 2,000 seats, as much as 4,500 in Atlanta."

At the Wynn, Mr. McCollum got the theater size he wanted, without censorship or the enormous cost of moving each week. And because concierges and cabbies are more influential than critics in Las Vegas, he also got the chance to let the work speak for itself. "On the road, by the time you develop word-of-mouth, you're in the next city," he said.

But in the long run, Vegas's biggest appeal may be to the artists. For stars, there's cachet and convenience: Mr. Fierstein may not wish to schlep from Toledo to Buffalo on the "Hairspray" tour, but three months in a house with a pool, even doing 10 shows a week on the Strip, is another story. For the directors and designers, there is the opportunity that arises from the city's ethos of constant - some say reckless - implosion and rebuilding. "Broadway theaters are lacking because they're landlocked and landmarked," said Michael Gill, who is co-producing the Las Vegas production of "Hairspray." "They have no space to grow or accommodate innovations. Here in Las Vegas we have nothing but space. There are no landmark laws: we can go up and out or anywhere we need. And to the casinos, the cost of a theater is, relatively, nothing."

As a result, Vegas offers technical capabilities that embarrassingly surpass those of any Broadway theater. Watching "Mystère" or "Le Rêve," you may be underwhelmed by the dramaturgy (enough with the soulful clowns already) but absolutely agape at the stagecraft. And though Mr. Dragone, the director, has announced plans to mount a spectacular, if nonoperatic, "Carmen" on Broadway in 2007, it's not clear that any Broadway theater could house or even be adapted for his sort of show.

No, what happens in Vegas will probably stay in Vegas. "Phantom" will open here with effects that would be impossible at the Majestic. "Hairspray" will get an explosive new ending. Even "Avenue Q" has a few new bells and whistles. But none of these changes will come back to New York. They can't. On the day before the first "Avenue Q" preview, Jason Moore, the director, pointed out all the backstage amenities that made the show more dynamic and the company more comfortable: lovely dressing rooms with Internet connections, wing space you can actually store a set in. Even the catwalks, Mr. Moore pointed out, are carpeted.

"In almost every way we can do things better here," he said.

There is, for instance, the case of the ceiling fan: a little visual joke Mr. Moore wanted to add to the set in New York. Mr. McCollum, the producer, said that because of what he called "idiotic" union work rules on Broadway, "it would have cost $100,000 in labor. Here it costs $28, the price of the fan. New York has some things to learn from Las Vegas."

Though the "Avenue Q" cast and crew work under union contracts, many shows here, like the Cirque productions, do not. (Nevada is a right-to-work state.) This, too, will tend to make the Broadway-Vegas traffic a one-way street. In any case, Vegas will not soon become Broadway's research and development plant, creating new product for the home office, because the Broadway stamp of success still means too much to the casinos. Nor will Vegas steal the tatty mantle of cultural hegemony from New York. Everyone here has a different formula for describing what you'll never see on the Strip: "Doubt," "Long Day's Journey Into Night," "Hecuba" with a two-drink minimum. Even a Europop version of "The Hunchback of Notre Dame," which played the Paris in 2000, proved too brooding.

Vegas doesn't want to brood. It wants respectability, like a real grown-up American city with suburbs and culture - but not too much. (The Boston Pops drew a skimpy audience when it played the MGM Grand.) It sees itself as a town where gambling is just another synergistic offering, like shopping, dining, spa treatments and now musicals, each feeding the others and ultimately the owners. Indeed, the visitor who comes here expressly for gaming is in the minority. "We're no longer in the casino or hospitality or tourism business," Mr. Rappaport, of the Luxor, said flatly. "Entertainment is our business."

One wonders if the same can still be said of Broadway, which looks more and more like a sclerotic real estate cartel. Vegas won't kill it (though it may kill the road, or the Western part of it) and may even be helpful: directly, by increasing profit for Broadway producers and, indirectly, by building audiences.

"There are people who come to the resorts who have never seen a show," Mr. Gill, the "Hairspray" co-producer, said. "Las Vegas has the potential to initiate them to what it means to sit in the theater." Possibly, but when they go to see "Hecuba" on Broadway, Kahlúa frozen chocolates in hand, they may be disappointed to learn that it has never actually played there.

nytimes.com/2005/10/02/theater ... res/02gree.html

Intentando Tap en una semana con un DVD (Ja!)

The New York Times, October 2, 2005

Learning as Fast as He Can

Marsha Pitt, from "Tapology," her DVD that lays out basic tap
Marsha Pitt, from "Tapology," her DVD that lays out basic tap [fuente]

By TANGO TANNER

MY girlfriend, Sally, tap dances. Her birthday was coming up, so I thought I'd surprise her by learning a little tap dance. Something simple - I was not trying out for the Rockettes, and besides, I had only one week.

New York has lots of great dance studios: Steps, Broadway Dance Center, New Dance Group. The problem with great dance studios, I find, is that they are full of great dancers. Even the beginners' classes are loaded with Equity cards and triple pirouettes. So I decided to save the hit to self-esteem and go the do-it-yourself route. At-home dance instruction has come a long way from the days of cut-out step diagrams or even VHS. DVD brings the instructor right into your living room without the clumsiness and cheesiness of the older tapes.

For order-in New Yorkers there are as many dance instruction titles on the Web as Chinese menus under the door: everything from ballroom to belly, country to krump. Many can be had for less than $15, the price of a single studio lesson. Production values and the quality of instruction vary, so the customer ratings on a site like Amazon.com can be useful. I settled on Marsha Pitt's "Tapology" (DVD, 27 minutes, $24.95), which promised that I would soon tap like a pro.

But can you really learn to dance from a DVD?

Day 1: I clear a little space in the living room and load the DVD into my laptop. "Tapology" starts with an MTV-style introduction, after which Ms. Pitt, dressed in a dark pinstripe suit and a red midriff-baring top, gets down to business.

I learn that there are five basic steps in tap: brush, shuffle, step, hop and leap.

First, Ms. Pitt demonstrates a time step, the rhythmic building block of all tap-dance routines. I'm lost already. She demonstrates it 15 times. I'm still lost. At a dance studio, I would be out the door. But with a simple click of the remote Ms. Pitt is demonstrating the step another 15 times. Another click, another 15. After six times through I manage a shaky time step. Repetition is good. Point: DVD.

I take a breather as "Tapology" launches into a music video, "Peek-a-Boo," featuring Ms. Pitt tapping and singing to her own music and lyrics. "Peek-a-boo, I see you/ watching all the things I do ... It's true-blue, woo-hoo." Marsha, Marsha, Marsha! Point: dance studio.

Day 2: Sleeping on it helped. I've now got the time step down. But is it tap dancing? To be honest, it feels more like hopscotch. We move on to the double time step. The double, I learn, is a brush added to the leap. Ms. Pitt demonstrates, to my utter mystification. On the third time through, my brain shuts off and the rhythm comes naturally, but that quickly passes. I break for a sandwich. I like having my kitchen right next to my dance studio. Point: DVD.

Day 3: It's a hot, muggy day, and I don't feel like getting sweaty. I cancel class. Ms. Pitt doesn't mind a bit. Point: DVD.

Day 4: The day off has done me good. I now have the time step and the double. Time to tackle the triple, which adds a shuffle to the leap. Ms. Pitt demonstrates. Now that looks like tap dancing.

My first attempt is a disaster: shuffles, hops and leaps pop out all over the place. Everything is off. Now I can't even do the single or the double. But that's the beauty of DVD: I can go back, refresh, reconstruct, try it again. At my own pace. Without spectators. Half an hour later, I have the triple. Point: DVD.

Day 5: Ms. Pitt throws in some running flaps, a series of rapid brush steps. Together with my triple time step, I figure I've got a birthday dance. I practice for a half-hour at lunch, then again before bed. The good thing about DVD dance instructors is they're always on call. Point: DVD.

Day 6: It's show time. I invite Sally over for dinner and a "little surprise." After clearing the dishes I light the candle on the key lime pie, then launch into "Happy Birthday" and running flaps. Dancing and singing at the same time is trickier than I thought. By the end, Sally is in stitches.

"Could you even tell what I was doing?" I ask.

"It looked like you were trying to do a time step," she says between squeals of laughter.

Game, set, match: dance studio.

- papá! mensaje para Tango Tanner: "Veníte a Geba, cada clase de Alberto Agüero es un show, y, en corto lapso podrás volverte a Nuyor con las bases del Tap y el corazón contento". (O quién te dice, en el 2006 AA hace una gira de seminarios por Santiago, San Pablo y New York).

Sofía Vergara

Hoy Digital, Santo Domingo, República Dominicana, sáb 01oct2005

Sofía Vergara reconoce que le falta como actriz

Sofía Vergara
Sofía Vergara

MÉXICO (AP).- La estrella colombiana Sofía Vergara confesó que nunca pensó que sería actriz, que su gran sueño de chica era ser dentista y que el cine sigue siendo para ella "una nueva aventura''.

hoy.com.do/app/article.aspx?id=55205

Watching Ligeti Move

DANCE

The Difference Between Art and Design

[ERIK TOMASSON]
LIGET'S LEGACY:
Muriel Maffre and Yuri Possokhov in Christopher Wheeldon's "Continuum
ERIK TOMASSON
LIGET'S LEGACY:
Muriel Maffre and Yuri Possokhov in Christopher Wheeldon's "Continuum [fuente]

By AERON KOPRIVA

With the curtain raised, dancers warmed up in plain view as the audience filed into the Miller Theatre on Wednesday night. They sketched out center combinations on the new “marley” floor installed only five days ago. The performance venue, usually associated with classical music, offered the dance public a candid opportunity to see members of New York City Ballet and San Francisco Ballet together on the same stage. The grand occasion was a program called “Watching Ligeti Move,” a performance of three ballets created by Christopher Wheeldon to the music of György Ligeti.

Mr. Wheeldon has enjoyed a quick ascendancy within New York City Ballet, placing him among the august ranks of Jerome Robbins and George Balanchine as one of the most versatile and compelling creators for the company, a position summed up in his role as the first Resident Choreographer. The modernist constructions of his Ligeti trilogy strongly resemble Balanchine’s own leotard ballets to Stravinsky; both composers, émigrés from Stalinist Europe, produced music that is richly assimilative of other traditions (ragtime, waltzes, and gamelan.) But the difference between Balanchine and Mr.Wheeldon is the difference between art and design — however good the design may be.

The first work on the program, “Polyphonia,” takes its name from musical language, meaning many voices sounding at once. The opening tableau featured eight dancers rapidly striking poses as their shadows whirred behind them. Divided into 10 sections,“Polyphonia” followed closely the personality of the score, drawn from six of Ligeti’s piano works. In the third section, a modified waltz, Andrew Veyette and Miranda Weese jauntily borrowed phrases from ballroom dance, which returned in the vivace energico of the fifth section between Mr.Veyette and Jason Fowler.

Perhaps more aptly, however, it was Mr. Wheeldon’s choreography to Ligeti’s dark and spare adagios that stuck out, most notably the duet between Wendy Whelan and Sébastien Marcovici. In a prolonged sequence of balances, Ms. Whelan contorted into spidery shapes, culminating in a back bend over her partner, a physical pun on the accompanying étude, titled “Arc-en-ciel.” The absence of Jock Soto, for whom Mr. Marcovici’s part was originally created, lessened a certain amount of the pathos. Likewise, corps dancer Glenn Keenan bravely tackled her solo to an excerpt of Ligeti’s “Three Wedding Marches,” but the lithe insistence of Alexandra Ansanelli was sorely missed — her bourrées and disconsolate spins, arms heavenward,gave the work a beating heart.

In “Continuum,” choreographed for San Francisco Ballet, Mr. Wheeldon added an additional 12 sections. He used similar motifs, including the introductory wall of shadows, the revolution of arms like weather vanes, and the ponderous contortions of the adagio passages (especially in “Continuum for Harpsicord,” which repeats a single note for minutes). But there was more humor, and greater economy, too. Yuan Yuan Tan and Damien Smith knelt down and faced each other like cats; variations were completed with wry glances back at each other.
“Morphoses,” the second work on the program,was the last to be created in the series.Set to Ligeti’s “String Quartet No. 1,” performed live by the Flux Quartet, the piece opened with the cast of four wreathing their arms together. In a compelling gesture of vulnerability, Amar Ramasar completed a difficult combination, and then teetered uncertainly. The image was repeated later as the two men hoisted up the women, who were buoyed with their arms outstretched, and passed each other like ships in the night.

For the most part, Mr.Wheeldon achieved the dance equivalent of Ligeti’s compositional style, which Mr.Wheeldon calls “micropolyphony.” The majority of the musical selection emphasized two competing voices: one repeating a percussive refrain, the other introducing a melody. As the work progressed, the two voices coalesced to form a dense rhythmic texture of tone qualities.

The approach is an alternative to more traditional forms of development, such as the progression of chords. It requires, above all, a stripping-down of the composition to its basic elements (pitch, volume, etc.), then rebuilding them in new ways. Similarly, Mr. Wheeldon distinguishes himself from other choreographers by his deft eye for recognizing and isolating movements to develop them in surprising directions. He avoids at all costs the “filler” that waters down so much modern ballet.

But in light of the clarity of his recent work, what struck me about these pieces, especially “Polyphonia,” was Mr.Wheeldon’s lack of confidence in his ability to create larger relationships beyond the formal architecture of a phrase. He seemed so fearful of making a cliché that he cluttered his dance with original but non-sequential poses.The quirky group allegros grew tiresome, as did the prayerful contortionist duets and the doll-like inanimate lifts. Although each piece succeeded individually, when viewed as a trilogy, Mr. Wheeldon’s musings soon began to cloy and diminish in effect.

September 30 & October 1 (2960 Broadway at 116th Street, 212-854-7799).

All Wear Bowlers

THEATER REVIEW

Laurels well-earned

Clowning meets Magritte in 'all wear bowlers.' And, yes, there's a reason those guys look so familiar.

[Lawrence K. Ho/LAT]
Trey Lyford, left, and Geoff Sobelle mess around with reality at the Kirk Douglas Theatre. In New York, their show earned a Drama Desk nomination for “unique theatrical experience.”
Lawrence K. Ho/LAT
Trey Lyford, left, and Geoff Sobelle mess around with reality at the Kirk Douglas Theatre. In New York, their show earned a Drama Desk nomination for “unique theatrical experience.” [fuente]

By F. Kathleen Foley, Special to The Times

Los Angeles Times, September 30, 2005

Dim lights reveal two bowler hats lying on the floor. As if moved by ghostly forces, the hats edge jerkily across the stage before zipping into the wings.

It's a fittingly odd image to open "all wear bowlers," the weird, wacky, impressively innovative performance piece being presented by Center Theatre Group at the Kirk Douglas Theatre in Culver City. The brainchild of Trey Lyford and Geoff Sobelle, "bowlers" is performed by the two actors on set designer Jarek Trusczynski's deceptively bare stage. The setting may be simple, but it yields its share of surprises and proves a fitting framework for the flights of invention to follow.

The production grew out of a chance comment made to Lyford about his pronounced physical resemblance to Stan Laurel. An actor with roots in experimental theater, Lyford began exploring the films of Laurel and Hardy and boning up on the works of prominent absurdists. After Sobelle came on board, the concept began to solidify. Rigorous workshops, including training sessions with master clown David Shiner, helped Lyford and Sobelle perfect the vocabulary of what they call "physical ventriloquism."

The rigor behind this production is evident. Initially produced in Philadelphia, the play — directed there as here, by Aleksandra Wolska — went on to a sold-out run in New York and a Drama Desk nomination for "unique theatrical experience."

"bowlers" is certainly that, one of those daunting experiences that beggars description.

A few snippets will have to suffice: The characters of Wyatt R. Levine (Lyford) and Earnest Matters (Sobelle) are introduced in a silent film, courtesy of filmmaker Michael Glass. While composer Michael Friedman's convincingly period musical score tinkles in the background, Wyatt and Earnest — little tramps sporting Tara Webb's appropriately shabby costumes — are seen wandering along a winding road in a dry, rustic landscape. The dynamic between the characters is quickly established. Wyatt is the hapless patsy, à la Stan Laurel; Earnest is his domineering but equally clueless pal, a sort of Oliver Hardy without the padding. Lost and woebegone, the two clowns stop to consult their map. A close-up reveals a white page, bisected by a single squiggly line with the words "You Are Here" scrawled beside it.

It's existential. It's Dada-esque. It's funny. And the action becomes even more bizarre when the characters burst out of the movie screen onto the stage. (The purposeful misdirection of Randy "Igleu" Glickman's lighting design contributes to this and other effects.) Staring out at the audience in horror, Earnest exclaims, "There's people here!" A silent universe of two has expanded into the unknown.

An almost indescribably clever sequence follows in which the actors leap between the stage and the film in increasingly frantic progression, while their filmic images perfectly mirror their live movements. In another scene — the most visually eloquent of the evening — the actors, sitting side by side and with only an empty bowler hat, a valise and a white napkin, create the remarkable illusion that a third person is sitting between them. It's a creepy image right out of Magritte.

These are only a couple of moments in the mind-boggling barrage that constitutes the show. Admittedly, some of the bits are marginally less witty, merely common magic tricks that drag on a whisper too long. But the play's absurdist veneer lends even these familiar illusions fresh charm, and the perfectly choreographed slapstick coalesces into something delightfully darker. Rubber-faced, lithe-limbed and sleight-handed, Lyford and Sobelle are surreal vaudevillians who ply their craft in an alternative dimension.

'all wear bowlers'
Where: Kirk Douglas Theatre, 9820 Washington Blvd., Culver City
When: 8 p.m. Tuesdays through Fridays, 2 and 8 p.m. Saturdays, 2 and 7 p.m. Sundays
Ends: Oct. 28
Price: . $20 to $40
Contact: (213) 628-2772, CenterTheatreGroup.org
Running time: 1 hour, 15 minutes

- Sí papá!, claro, en los GebaShows también aparecen bailarines con bombín !

GebaShow 11dic2004 Terracita. De izquierda a derecha: Liliana Coco, Angélica Manterola, Violeta Cunningham, Héctor (Titi) Orlando, Augusto Lapeyre, Roxana Fernández, María Alicia (La Negra) Brunero.
GebaShow 11dic2004 Terracita. De izquierda a derecha: Liliana Coco, Angélica Manterola, Violeta Cunningham, Héctor (Titi) Orlando, Augusto Lapeyre, Roxana Fernández, María Alicia (La Negra) Brunero.

Dance of the Elements

The New York Sun, Thu 29Sep2005
DANCE

Riotous Good Cheer

[STEPHANIE BERGER]
SMOOTH AS SILK
Jody Sperling performing ‘Dance of the Elements’ at City Center.
STEPHANIE BERGER
SMOOTH AS SILK
Jody Sperling performing ‘Dance of the Elements’ at City Center. [fuente]

[Stephanie Berger for The New York Times]
Jody Sperling in "Dance of the Elements," which was excerpted as part of Fall for Dance on Tuesday.
Stephanie Berger for The New York Times
Jody Sperling in "Dance of the Elements," which was excerpted as part of Fall for Dance on Tuesday. [fuente]
nytimes.com/2005/09/29/arts/dance/29fall.html

By AERON KOPRIVA

What do slap dance, a clown, modern ballet, and more than 80 yards of white silk have in common? Not much. But they all took the stage Tuesday night at the City Center, when five very different companies kicked off the second annual Fall for Dance Festival.

...

daily.nysun.com/Daily/Skins/NY ... n/navigator.asp

NYT: nytimes.com/2005/09/29/arts/dance/29fall.html

Celtic Tiger

The New York Times, September 29, 2005

Irish Eyes Are Burning Bright, Irish Feet Are Stepping Light

[Michelle V. Agins/The New York Times]
Michael Flatley in "Celtic Tiger" at Madison Square Garden.
Michelle V. Agins/The New York Times
Michael Flatley in "Celtic Tiger" at Madison Square Garden. [fuente]
nytimes.com/2005/09/29/arts/dance/29flat.html

By CLAUDIA LA ROCCO

Leather pants, chesty blondes, flag-waving bravado. "Celtic Tiger" is almost entirely a vehicle for Michael Flatley's ego. Depending on your feelings toward Mr. Flatley, the Lord of the Dance, this is very good or very bad.

The phenomenon elevated by "Riverdance" brought his new show to Madison Square Garden on Tuesday for its American debut. Philistines cheered while traditionalists rolled their eyes as the barbarians step-danced through the gates, heralded by pyrotechnics and explosive video displays. The dancers also sashayed, shimmied and, in one memorable number, stripped. As Irish-tinged music blared and smoke billowed across the stage, screaming audience members, many of whom had been well served by the beer vendors, surged to their feet.

Mr. Flatley is the consummate showman, and "Celtic Tiger" is more spectacle than dance. This is a shame for those who actually hope to see Irish dancing. His bare chest and prancing antics are no match for his flying feet, and those long lines of dancers stamping in pounding unison still impress. But Ronan Hardiman's overheated score obscures the rhythms that should take center stage, while erotic writhing replaces militarylike precision and kicking leaps. Anyone looking forward to rigidly held arms or delicate fiddle melodies should look into ticket refunds.

The show takes its name from the phrase used to describe Ireland as it enjoys a fast-growing economy. "Celtic Tiger," created, produced and directed by Mr. Flatley, follows a loose history of struggle and perseverance in Ireland and the United States. (During certain numbers the Irish nationalistic fervor overwhelms.) But it's clear who the show's real tiger is, whether he is an Irish street tough, Al Capone wielding a machine gun or a dashing pilot swaggering for a stewardess.

"Everyone in the world will tell you, 'No it can't be done,' " Mr. Flatley announces in the program. "Every time I hear that I know I'm close to success." When a contingent of British Redcoat baddies pillages and plunders an Irish thatched cottage, sending a stream of scantily clad women staggering from the flames, Mr. Flatley follows in priestly garb. Stroking his rosaries as the soldiers descend, he murmurs, "Deliver us from evil." But the glint in his eye leaves no doubt that Mr. Flatley will be doing his own saving. To the tune of "Yankee Doodle," no less.

nytimes.com/2005/09/29/arts/dance/29flat.html

Chichí Peralta

Diario Libre, Santo Domingo, República Dominicana, mie 28sep2005

Portada nuevo CD
Portada nuevo CD

SANTO DOMINGO. El artista Chichí Peralta asciende peldaños en la lista tropical de Billboard con el tema “La Zalamera”, pieza cuyo vídeo también se puede ver en la programación regular del canal especializado HTV. "La Zalamera", según informó la oficina de Peralta en el país, debutó hace cuatro semanas en la mencionada lista tropical en la posición número 13. Peralta, representante dominicano del “fusón”, se apresta a lanzar su tercer álbum, con el sello Venemusic, una división de Venevisión Internacional

¿Te incomodan las arruguitas?

martes, 27 de septiembre de 2005 11:00
Weekly Review

Scientific American Newsletters

Suzan Obagi
Suzan Obagi

Why does skin wrinkle with age? What is the best way to slow or prevent this process?

Suzan Obagi, assistant professor in dermatology at the University of Pittsburgh and director of the Cosmetic Surgery and Skin Health Center, explains.

...

sciam.com/askexpert_question.c ... 2EC83414B7F0000

Fall for Dance

The New York Times, September 27, 2005

No Toe Shoes but, Yes, Goofy Innocence and Rigorous Sensuality

[Stephanie Berger]
Bill Irwin performing on Tuesday.
Stephanie Berger
Bill Irwin performing on Tuesday. [fuente]
nytimes.com/2005/09/27/arts/ex ... a-rockwell.html

By JOHN ROCKWELL

By now, everyone who is interested in dance or even mildly curious about dance knows the drill: six evenings, five companies or artists per evening, $10 a ticket anywhere in the 2,750-seat City Center. It’s Fall for Dance, which made a big splash in its debut run last year and now seems to have become something of a marker at the outset of a new season of dance.

...

Fall for Dance
New York City Center
Fall for Dance continues through Sunday at the New York City Center, 131 West 55th Street, (212) 581-1212; nycitycenter.org.

nytimes.com/2005/09/27/arts/ex ... a-rockwell.html

Famoso Diálogo desde el Zapatófono

Maxwell Smart's Shoe Phone (Get Smart)

Zapatófono
“Get Smart”
Talent Associates
NBC, 1965-69
CBS, 1969-70

Operator: "What number are you calling?"
Smart: "I'm calling Control, Operator…"
Operator: "You have dialed incorrectly. Give me your name and address and your dime will be refunded."
Smart: "Operator, I'm calling from my shoe!"
Operator: "What is the number of your shoe?"
Smart: "It's an unlisted shoe, Operator!"

Would you believe that this is the most famous prop in television history? Would you believe the second most famous? While other spies hid their radios in pens, cigarette cases and lighters, Maxwell Smart, Agent 86 of Control, cleverly housed a telephone in his shoe. As used for five seasons by Don Adams in the Emmy-winning comedy series, the Shoe Phone has earned a permanent place in our memories, our hearts, and especially our funny bones, as a classic icon of popular culture.

Copyright 2000 SpyFiArchives and Danny Biederman.

cia.gov/spy_fi/item15.html

Sí Papá, es el sitio de la CIA (Central Intelligency Agency) Publicado anteriormente en la Newsletter

Zapatófono Get Smart Maxwell Smart Maxwell Smart

  1. Zapatófono: cia.gov/spy_fi/graphics/shoe_phone.jpg
  2. Get Smart: tvacres.com/spies_86.htm
  3. Maxwell Smart: freerepublic.com/~1rudeboy/in-forum
  4. Maxwell Smart: tvacres.com/images/phone_smart4.jpg

Viñetas Dominicanas: Fello Francisco

Rafael Francisco Ulloa -Fello- es oriundo de Rancho Viejo, Altamira. Nació en 1922. Acordeonista, cantante, compositor. Era un niño cuando ya se le buscaba para amenizar bailes en su comarca y localidades aledañas. Sus fiestas eran rumbosas y concurridas, especialmente cuando Fello era acompañado por su hermano, el excelente saxofonista típico Nicolás Delmiro Francisco -Miro-. Fello es también autor de varias composiciones, entre ellas, La Botija, basada en una experiencia real, a la cual este célebre personaje del merengue folclórico le pone la gracia suficiente como para seguir gozando de amplia popularidad en los medios merengueros del país. Aunque retirado de la música como oficio, don Fello reside en el municipio de Guananico, de la provincia Puerto Plata.

La Botija
Fello Francisco

Cristoba´y Lorenza
´taban enemigos
por una botija que sacaron
se hicieron amigos.

Le dice Cristoba´
vámonos p´al pueblo,
que hacemo ´en el campo muchacha,
con tanto dinero.

Le dice Lorenza
qué es eso que brilla,
esas son las onzas, muchacha,
que son amarillas.

Como a medianoche
se oye un traque traque,
eso era Lorenza
con Fidelio Jáquez.

Para terminar
se lo dice Fello:
la botija era
de tornillos viejos.

(Ripiando El perico, Antología del merengue típico, Huchi Lora y Rafael Chaljub Mejía, 2005, Grupo León Jimenes, República Dominicana. Disco 2, tema 6, "La Botija" 3.17, canta Rafelito Román).

Yoryi Morel (1906-1979), Fiesta, 1960, Oleo, 50 x 60 cm
Yoryi Morel (1906-1979), Fiesta, 1960, Oleo, 50 x 60 cm

Almanaque Bailador Octubre 2005

Almanaque Bailador Octubre 2005

La Figurita de Hoy

Roxana Rosso
25Roxana Rosso

Álbum de figuritas al día de hoy

La Foto Original

GebaShow Terracita Sección San Martín 26sep2004
Liliana Coco, Eda Fernández, Violeta Cunningham, Graciela Gianotti, Augusto Lapeyre, Patricia Leal, Roxana Rosso, Celia Tazelaar, Edgardo Piferrer.
GebaShow Terracita Sección San Martín 26sep2004
Liliana Coco, Eda Fernández, Violeta Cunningham, Graciela Gianotti, Augusto Lapeyre, Patricia Leal, Roxana Rosso, Celia Tazelaar, Edgardo Piferrer.

Coplita

To' el mundo conocerá
En la presión que yo toi
Haceite una caita voy
Directamente pa´ti.

Fuente:
Héctor Payano
La Décima Popular Dominicana
2003, Editora Centenario S.A.
Santo Domingo, República Dominicana, p304/5

Imágenes de Salida

NYT September 28, 2005

[Jérôme Maison/Bonne Pioche Productions/Alliance de Production Cinématographique]
Documentary-maker and star on the "set" of "March of the Penguins."
Jérôme Maison/Bonne Pioche Productions/Alliance de Production Cinématographique
Documentary-maker and star on the "set" of "March of the Penguins." [fuente]
nytimes.com/2005/09/28/movies/28peng.html

- papá! durante el último festival del merengue en Santo Domingo bailamos "El Pingüino" con Johnny Ventura.

HELMUT NEWTON (1920-2004)
Madonna Dancing on Bar with Beer Bottle, Hollywood, 1990
gelatin silver print
signed, titled, dated and numbered '1/10' in pencil (on the verso)
19 1/8 x 19in. (48.6 x 48.2cm.)
HELMUT NEWTON (1920-2004)
Madonna Dancing on Bar with Beer Bottle, Hollywood, 1990
gelatin silver print
signed, titled, dated and numbered '1/10' in pencil (on the verso)
19 1/8 x 19in. (48.6 x 48.2cm.) [fuente]
christies.com/LotFinder/lot_de ... bjectID=4572152

Price Realized
$96,000
Estimate
$20,000 - $30,000
Get a shipping estimate
Sale Information
Sale 1642
20TH CENTURY PHOTOGRAPHS THE ELFERING COLLECTION
10 October 2005
New York, Rockefeller Plaza

THE NEW YORK SUN WED 28SEP2005

ON THE DOWN LOW:
La Nacional is noe of several semi-secret spots in town.
/ La Nacional (239 W. 14th St., 212-243-9308): If you peer through the garden-level windows at this unassuming brownstone on 14th Street — and if the curtains aren’t fully drawn, as they sometimes are — you may be able to see some people eating. But the setting looks more like someone’s home than a restaurant, and there’s little on the outside to suggest a commercial establishment. Go down through the lower-level doorway, however, and you’ll find that you’ve entered the Spanish Benevolent Society, founded in 1868 as a gathering place for Spanish expats and travelers — and for anyone else lucky enough to walk in. There’s a bar, lots of lively chatter en Español, and most importantly, a world-class paella ($15), packed with shrimp, mussels, clams, squid, and chicken. It may not be Spain,but it sure feels a long way from New York.
ON THE DOWN LOW:
La Nacional is noe of several semi-secret spots in town.
/ La Nacional (239 W. 14th St., 212-243-9308): If you peer through the garden-level windows at this unassuming brownstone on 14th Street — and if the curtains aren’t fully drawn, as they sometimes are — you may be able to see some people eating. But the setting looks more like someone’s home than a restaurant, and there’s little on the outside to suggest a commercial establishment. Go down through the lower-level doorway, however, and you’ll find that you’ve entered the Spanish Benevolent Society, founded in 1868 as a gathering place for Spanish expats and travelers — and for anyone else lucky enough to walk in. There’s a bar, lots of lively chatter en Español, and most importantly, a world-class paella ($15), packed with shrimp, mussels, clams, squid, and chicken. It may not be Spain,but it sure feels a long way from New York.

THE NEW YORK SUN THU 29SEP2005

[HAMMER GALLERIES]
BOX SET
Peter Anton’s large-scale sculptures of sweets are on view at Hammer Galleries. Above: ‘Elaborate’ (2005).
HAMMER GALLERIES
BOX SET
Peter Anton’s large-scale sculptures of sweets are on view at Hammer Galleries. Above: ‘Elaborate’ (2005). [fuente]

THE NEW YORK SUN THU 29SEP2005

[SALANDER - O ' REILLY]
Henri Matisse’s ‘The Piano Lesson’ (1916), top, is one of the central pictures of Modernism. The founding director of the Museum of Modern Art, Alfred Barr, wrote, ‘There are some Cubist vestiges in “The Piano Lesson,” but no Cubist ever surpassed the beautiful divisions, the grave and tranquil elegance of this big picture. Nor did Matisse himself.’
SALANDER - O ' REILLY
Henri Matisse’s ‘The Piano Lesson’ (1916), top, is one of the central pictures of Modernism. The founding director of the Museum of Modern Art, Alfred Barr, wrote, ‘There are some Cubist vestiges in “The Piano Lesson,” but no Cubist ever surpassed the beautiful divisions, the grave and tranquil elegance of this big picture. Nor did Matisse himself.’ [fuente]

NYT September 30, 2005

[Sidney Baldwin/Universal Studios]
Morena Baccarin and Chiwetel Ejiofor in "Serenity."
Sidney Baldwin/Universal Studios
Morena Baccarin and Chiwetel Ejiofor in "Serenity." [fuente]
movies2.nytimes.com/2005/09/30 ... ies/30sere.html

NYT September 30, 2005

[Dana Edelson/NBC]
From drums to jokes: Fred Armisen, now of "Saturday Night Live."
Dana Edelson/NBC
From drums to jokes: Fred Armisen, now of "Saturday Night Live." [fuente]
nytimes.com/2005/09/30/arts/te ... ion/30fred.html

Buena camisa, Papá !
Mami ! con esa indumentaria estás invitada a la exhibición de Salsa !

THE NEW YORK SUN FRI 30SEP2005

ON THEIR OWN
Andrew Edlin Gallery displays the work of ‘outsider artists’ Adolf Wölfli and Henry Darger. Darger’s ‘184 at Jennie Richee, rain water spreads over the ground...’
ON THEIR OWN
Andrew Edlin Gallery displays the work of ‘outsider artists’ Adolf Wölfli and Henry Darger. Darger’s ‘184 at Jennie Richee, rain water spreads over the ground...’ [fuente]

ON THEIR OWN
Andrew Edlin Gallery displays the work of ‘outsider artists’ Adolf Wölfli and Henry Darger.
An untitled work by Wölfli, c. 1925.
ON THEIR OWN
Andrew Edlin Gallery displays the work of ‘outsider artists’ Adolf Wölfli and Henry Darger.
An untitled work by Wölfli, c. 1925. [fuente]

[Francois Guillot AFP/Getty Images]
Missoni creations came in a rich rainbow of patterns and stripes.
Springs 2006 Collections
Francois Guillot AFP/Getty Images
Missoni creations came in a rich rainbow of patterns and stripes.
Springs 2006 Collections [fuente]
calendarlive.com/printedition/ ... 0,3063289.story

TheatreDance.comChau!, nos vemos en Geba !