"Newsletter" Aerolatino-Geba
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SWEENEY TODD<br>The Demon Barber of Fleet Street
SWEENEY TODD
The Demon Barber of Fleet Street

SWEENEY TODD
The Demon Barber of Fleet Street

DreamWorks Pictures and Warner Bros. Pictures Present
A Parkes/MacDonald Production A Zanuck Company Production
Produced by Richard D. Zanuck, Walter F. Parkes, Laurie MacDonald, John Logan
Executive Producer Patrick McCormick
Music and Lyrics by Stephen Sondheim
Based on the Musical by Stephen Sondheim and Hugh Wheeler
Originally Staged by Harold Prince
From an adaptation by Christopher Bond
Screenplay by John Logan
Directed by Tim Burton

CAST: Johnny Depp, Helena Bonham Carter, Alan Rickman, Timothy Spall and Sacha Baron Cohen

SYNOPSIS: Johnny Depp and Tim Burton join forces again in a big-screen adaptation of Stephen Sondheim's award-winning musical thriller "Sweeney Todd." Depp stars in the title role as a man unjustly sent to prison who vows revenge, not only for that cruel punishment, but for the devastating consequences of what happened to his wife and daughter. When he returns to reopen his barber shop, Sweeney Todd becomes the Demon Barber of Fleet Street who "shaved the heads of gentlemen who never thereafter were heard from again." Joining Depp is Helena Bonham Carter as Mrs. Lovett, Sweeney's amorous accomplice, who creates diabolical meat pies. The cast also includes Alan Rickman, who portrays the evil Judge Turpin, who sends Sweeney to prison and Timothy Spall as the Judge's wicked associate Beadle Bamford and Sacha Baron Cohen is a rival barber, the flamboyant Signor Adolfo Pirelli.

sweeneytoddmovie.com

Ad Libitum en Clásica y Moderna, viernes 29feb2008, Trasnoche (Lucía Patricia Petrucci)

domingo, 24 de febrero de 2008 21:03
Ad Libitum

Lucía Patricia Petrucci

Ad Libitum "de poco un todo"
Ad Libitum "de poco un todo"
ad-libitum.com.ar

Ad Libitum presenta
"De Poco un Todo"
29 de febrero
"Clásica y Moderna" - Callao 892-
4812-8707 /4811-367

Ad Libitum, el dúo formado por Patricia Calviño - teclado y voz - y Fernando Acosta y Lara - guitarra y voz - presentan su espectáculo "De Poco un Todo".

El dúo recrea melodías de hoy y de siempre transitando los mas variados estilos como el tango, folklore, jazz y comedia musical, y hasta un mini homenaje a cantantes destacadas como Mina y Edith Piaf y temas propios, siempre respetando el espíritu original de cada estilo musical.

"De Poco un Todo" está hecho desde, y para el alma (insensibles?.........abstenerse!)

Ad Libitum se presentará el día viernes 29 de febrero en trasnoche a las 0,45 hs. en Clásica y Moderna - Callao 892 - Capital.
El valor de la entrada es de $15, para reservas comunicarse al 4812-8707 /4811-3670

Theater Listings

The New York Times, February 24, 2008

Theater Listings

By STEVEN McELROY
Dates are subject to change.

February

FABULOUS DIVAS OF BROADWAY Alan Palmer, a Los Angeles performer and director, portrays 18 women in a one-man show that includes more than two dozen songs, each performed in the style (and dress) of his subjects: among them, Patti LuPone, Liza Minnelli, Carol Channing and Ethel Merman. In previews. Opens Wednesday. St. Luke’s Theater, 308 West 46th Street, Clinton. Telecharge. fabdivas.com.

fabdivas.com/gallery.php (as Chita Rivera)

PASSING STRANGE This semi-autobiographical coming-of-age story, with book and lyrics by the singer-songwriter Stew and music by him and Heidi Rodewald, opened at the Public Theater last spring, prompting a number of critics to describe Stew as a vibrant new voice in the world of theatrical composing. It seems fitting now that the show, a musical-theater piece cum rock concert that tells the tale of a globe-trotting young African-American bohemian on a journey of self-discovery, is heading to Broadway. The original cast, again directed by Annie Dorsen (see “Democracy in America” below) and including Stew, will make the transfer. In previews. Opens Thursday. Belasco Theater, 111 West 44th Street. Telecharge. passingstrangeonbroadway.com

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passingstrangeonbroadway.com/thereal.php

SECRETS OF A SOCCER MOM Judith Ivey directs this new play by Kathleen Clark, about three women who decide to play in an annual mother-son soccer game and discover that the competition stokes their desire to recapture their spirit of adventure. In previews. Opens March 5. The Snapple Theater Center, 1627 Broadway, at 50th Street, (866) 811-4111. secretsofasoccermom.com.

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secretsofasoccermom.com

IN THE HEIGHTS This musical, which unites Latin rhythms, hip-hop and musical theater, won a lot of interested attention in its initial Off Broadway run at 37 Arts last year. With a book by Quiara Alegría Hudes and music and lyrics by Lin-Manuel Miranda, who also stars, this show about a tight-knit community in the changing Latino neighborhood of Washington Heights comes to Broadway. Thomas Kail again directs the cast of 27, and Andy Blankenbuehler returns to choreograph. In previews. Opens March 9. Richard Rodgers Theater, 226 West 46th Street. Ticketmaster. intheheightsthemusical.com.

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broadway.com/gen/Buzz_Story.aspx?ci=558740

March

27 RUE DE FLEURUS This new musical about Gertrude Stein and her secretary-lover-confidante, Alice B. Toklas, has a neat premise: The story is told from Toklas’s point of view until Stein has some complaints about the telling and hijacks the show. Ted Sod wrote the book for this Urban Stages production, Lisa Koch composed the music and both wrote the lyrics. Frances Hill, the company’s artistic director, is the director. Previews begin March 1. Opens March 6. Closes April 6. Urban Stages, 259 West 30th Street, Manhattan. SmartTix. urbanstages.org

The Photo

gertrudeandalice.com

SOUTH PACIFIC Bartlett Sher (“The Light in the Piazza”) will direct the first major Broadway revival of the 1949 Rodgers and Hammerstein musical. The original Broadway version, which opened on April 7, 1949, ran for an impressive 1,925 performances. This Lincoln Center Theater production, with Kelli O’Hara as the Navy nurse Nellie Forbush and a Brazilian opera singer, Paulo Szot, as the French planter Émile de Becque, is a limited run. Previews begin March 1. Opens April 3. Through June 15. Vivian Beaumont Theater, Lincoln Center. Telecharge. lct.org

South Pacific Tickets

search.telecharge.com/document ... 12&doc=1&sort=8

GYPSY Last summer’s brief presentation of this 1959 musical starred Patti LuPone as the powerhouse stage mother Momma Rose in the inaugural Encores! Summer Stars series at City Center. Ms. LuPone won plenty of raves, and the buzz began to build for a Broadway encore. The book is by Arthur Laurents, music by Jule Styne and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, with Mr. Laurents returning as director. Boyd Gaines as Herbie and Laura Benanti in the title role, both of whom received praise, will also be back. Previews begin March 3. Opens March 27. St. James Theater, 246 West 44th Street, Manhattan. Telecharge. nycitycenter.org

Gypsy Tickets

search.telecharge.com/document ... 14&doc=1&sort=8

CRY-BABY As “Hairspray” approaches its sixth anniversary on Broadway, another theatrical adaptation of a John Waters film is on the way from the La Jolla Playhouse in California, where “Jersey Boys” and “The Farnsworth Invention” started out and where some West Coast reviews of “Cry-Baby” were quite favorable. In 1954 Baltimore everyone likes Ike and hates the Commies. The title character and bad boy, Wade Walker (James Snyder), falls for the blue-blood good girl Allison (Elizabeth Stanley), and she for him. But some people, like Allison’s high-society grandma (Harriet Harris), do not approve. Mark O’Donnell and Thomas Meehan teamed up on the book, as they did for “Hairspray.” David Javerbaum and Adam Schlesinger wrote the music and lyrics, and Mark Brokaw directs. Previews begin March 15. Opens April 24. Marquis Theater, 1535 Broadway, at 45th Street (in the Marriott Marquis Hotel). Ticketmaster. crybabyonbroadway.com.

Cry Baby Tickets

ticketmaster.com/artist/119368 ... m_header_search

A CATERED AFFAIR Harvey Fierstein wrote the book and John Bucchino the score for this musical based on Gore Vidal’s screenplay for the 1956 film and Paddy Chayefsky’s 1955 teleplay. The show comes to Broadway following a successful run at the Old Globe Theater in San Diego. In this echt New York story, a poor Bronx couple’s daughter is soon to marry. Should the parents spend their limited funds on a lavish wedding when dear daughter doesn’t even want one, and the father needs the money for a taxi medallion? Faith Prince and Tom Wopat are the unhappy pair (Bette Davis and Ernest Borgnine in the movie), with Mr. Fierstein as the uncle (Barry Fitzgerald in the film) and Leslie Kritzer as the harassed daughter (Debbie Reynolds in the movie). John Doyle (“Company,” “Sweeney Todd”) directs. Previews begin March 25. Opens April 17. Walter Kerr Theater, 219 West 48th Street. Telecharge. acateredaffaironbroadway.com

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MARCY IN THE GALAXY This new musical — with book, music and lyrics by Nancy Shayne and based on a story by Ms. Shayne and the Emmy Award-winning writer and producer Michael Patrick King (“Sex and the City”) — is about a middle-aged woman whose dream of being an artist in New York is not panning out. A night alone at the Galaxy Diner allows for some self-examination, and the pain of waning hope and frustrated ambition is partly salved by yummy diner desserts. Jack Cummings III directs the Transport Group production. Previews begin March 28. Opens April 5. Closes April 20. Connelly Theater, 220 East Fourth Street, East Village, (212) 560-4372. transportgroup.org

April

May

NO, NO, NANETTE City Center has assembled an impressive cast of funny people for this revival of the comedy with music by Vincent Youmans, lyrics by Irving Caesar and Otto Harbach, and a book by Harbach and Frank Mandel. Rosie O’Donnell, Beth Leavel, Sandy Duncan and Fred Willard are among the performers in the final offering of this season’s Encores! musical concert series. (Marc Blitzstein’s “Juno,” based on the Sean O’Casey play “Juno and the Paycock,” starring Victoria Clark and directed by Garry Hynes, will run March 27 to 30.) “Nanette” first opened on Broadway in 1925, but it’s the 1971 revival — supervised by Busby Berkeley and adapted and directed by Burt Shevelove — that Encores! will revive, with Walter Bobbie directing. May 8 to 12. City Center, 131 West 55th Street, Manhattan, (212) 581-1212. nycitycenter.org

click for larger image

nycitycenter.org/events/event_ ... vent_code=EN308

SAVED Playwrights Horizons presents the world premiere of a new musical based on the 2004 film about the students of American Eagle Christian High School. When our heroine, the devout good girl Mary (get it?) finds out that her boyfriend might be gay, she sees Jesus in a vision, and he encourages her to do everything she can to straighten that boy out. The results cause Mary, played by Celia Keenan-Bolger (“The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee”), to question what she has always believed. The book is by John Dempsey and Rinne Groff, music by Michael Friedman and the lyrics a team effort by all three. Gary Griffin (“The Color Purple”) directs, with choreography by Sergio Trujillo (“Jersey Boys”). Previews begin May 9. Opens June 3. Closes June 22. Playwrights Horizons Mainstage Theater, 416 West 42nd Street, Clinton. Ticket Central. playwrightshorizons.org

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broadwayworld.com/viewcolumn.cfm?colid=18058

June

Compiled with the assistance of Suzanne O’Connor.
TICKET SERVICES
SMARTTIX, (212) 868-4444; smarttix.com
TELECHARGE, (212) 239-6200 or (800) 432-7250; telecharge.com
THEATERMANIA, (212) 352-3101 or (866) 811-4111; theatermania.com
TICKET CENTRAL, (212) 279-4200; ticketcentral.com
TICKETMASTER, (212) 307-4100 or (800) 755-4000; ticketmaster.com

Breaking the Mold of the Musical

The New York Times, February 24, 2008

By CHARLES ISHERWOOD

[Sara Krulwich/The New York Times]
The cast of “In the Heights,” with the songwriter Lin-Manuel Miranda, center.
Sara Krulwich/The New York Times
The cast of “In the Heights,” with the songwriter Lin-Manuel Miranda, center. [fuente]
nytimes.com/2008/02/24/theater/24ishe.html

THE spring season’s small crop of new musicals is intriguingly diverse, signifying how the definition of the Broadway musical continues to expand. Artists grope their way forward, trying to invigorate the old forms, even as they search out new ones. Each represents one or another of the assorted impulses behind the making of the 21st-century American musical.

“Cry-Baby,” which opens April 24, is the play-it-safe choice firmly in tune with current popular trends. Musical creators have been going the popcorn-and-soda route for source material with numbing regularity in recent years. In this case the success of “Hairspray” has encouraged another dip into the pungent oeuvre of John Waters. The book is by two proven hit-meisters: Mark O’Donnell and Thomas Meehan, who did the same chores on the stage version of “Hairspray.” The score is by an unproven team, Adam Schlesinger, of the band Fountains of Wayne, and David Javerbaum, a former writer for “The Daily Show.”

“A Catered Affair,” opening April 17, is also based on a movie (itself based on a television play by Paddy Chayefsky), but it departs from the current fashion in film-to-stage adaptations by ignoring period-pop pastiche in favor of a darker-hued, and more traditional, musical style. The score is by John Bucchino, a favorite songwriter of cabaret artists who have exhausted the Sondheim songbook. Mr. Bucchino has yet to break through on Broadway, but his collaborator on the project, Harvey Fierstein, certainly knows his way around the Rialto, both backstage and onstage.

If “Cry-Baby” epitomizes the current state of affairs on Broadway and “A Catered Affair” suggests a throwback to the traditional book musicals of the golden age, the other new musicals on offer, “Passing Strange” opening Feb. 28 and “In the Heights” opening March 9 are radical departures from the norm, if a business as haphazard as the making of musicals can be said to have a norm.

The trailblazing “Spring Awakening” has proved that mainstream audiences are willing to embrace new sounds in an environment where the familiar tends to reign supreme. Of course the trail is not entirely untrodden. The commercial and critical success of “Spring Awakening” in many ways replicates that of “Rent,” the Jonathan Larson musical that will close in June after a dozen years on Broadway, and for that matter “Hair,” the celebration of ’60s youth culture that will return to Central Park this summer. In between such milestones, however, successful experiments in pushing the Broadway musical into new territory have been few.

So it is striking that this spring two new shows are bringing distinctive musical vocabularies to the precincts around 42nd Street. Both found their footing Off Broadway, as both “Rent” and “Spring Awakening” did. But in recent years the commercial market for musicals has vaporized Off Broadway; witness the three years it took the small-scale boy-band spoof “Altar Boyz” to turn a profit.

Lin-Manuel Miranda, the star and songwriter behind “In the Heights,” grew up in Washington Heights, but I’d be willing to bet his iPod is well stocked with classic show tunes. His score fuses familiar Broadway forms — the romantic ballad, the character-defining solo — with the seasonings of Latino music, from salsa to rap. Similarly, the book by Quiara Alegría Hudes blends the conventional with the novel, as it draws a warm-spirited portrait of a community in transition and a city block on the verge of transformation. The musical is enlivened by Mr. Miranda’s ebullient performance in a central role as a young man who lends an ear to everybody’s troubles while dispensing café con leche from a bodega.

“Passing Strange” is a still more risky proposition for Broadway. The music is rhythmic rock, in variations ranging from punk to ’80s electronica and beyond. It is performed onstage by a small band led by Heidi Rodewald, who composed the music with the show’s star, the singer-songwriter Stew, who wrote the book and lyrics.

The show is an intimate, reflective journey through Stew’s upbringing as an angry young man rebelling against black bourgeois life in Southern California. In search of the authentic, and vowing to make his name as a true-blue bohemian artist, Stew’s alter ego, played by Daniel Breaker, moves through the hash bars of Amsterdam and the punk clubs of Berlin looking for love and inspiration. Narrating his life as it unfolds before him, Stew offers pointed musical commentary on the distance between the ideals of youth and the compromises that inevitably follow.

“Passing Strange” is a quirky, funny and deeply personal show, far from the high-gloss, market-tested and often mechanical musicals that are more regularly seen on Broadway. But then “In the Heights” expresses a personal vision too, a glimpse of Manhattan from a perspective new to most Broadway ticket buyers.

Maybe the most intriguing question of the spring season is whether audiences will take them up on their offers to see the world through their eyes, and hear it with their ears, for a couple of hours.

nytimes.com/2008/02/24/theater/24ishe.html

Multimedia

Audio Q&A: Charles Isherwood interviews Heidi Rodewald and Stew, who collaborated on the musical 'Passing Strange' (mp3) 09:58

Related
Theater Review | 'Passing Strange': Look Back in Chagrin: A Rocker’s Progress (May 15, 2007)
Theater Review | 'In the Heights': From the Corner Bodega, the Music of Everyday Life (February 9, 2007)

“The Dragon’s Gift: The Sacred Arts of Bhutan” at the Honolulu Academy of Arts

The New York Times, February 24, 2008
ARt

A Kingdom in the Mountains Shares Its Secrets

By SUSAN EMERLING

[Shuzo Uemoto/Honolulu Academy of Arts]
Black Hat dancers in Thimphu. They will perform at the opening ceremony of an unprecedented exhibition of art and dances from Bhutan in Honolulu
Shuzo Uemoto/Honolulu Academy of Arts
Black Hat dancers in Thimphu. They will perform at the opening ceremony of an unprecedented exhibition of art and dances from Bhutan in Honolulu [fuente]
nytimes.com/slideshow/2008/02/ ... EMER_index.html

WHEN American curators arrived one spring morning at Norbugang Yu Lhakang, a Buddhist temple in a remote village in western Bhutan, they found a group of monks sitting on the floor in bright robes, chanting. They had been there since 6 a.m., intent on creating the right ambience for a divination ceremony.

...

nytimes.com/2008/02/24/arts/de ... ign/24emer.html

Dancers at the Yungdrung Choeling Palace in Bhutan's Trongsa District in May 2007.
/ Meanwhile Joseph Houseal, a choreographer and dance preservationist, investigated Bhutanese cham dances, and noninvasive ways to record them. “People came to trust us, and they let us see secret things,” he said. “We revived four dances and saved one from extinction that was only known to one person in his 80s.”
[Photo: Heloisa Oliveira]
Dancers at the Yungdrung Choeling Palace in Bhutan's Trongsa District in May 2007.
/ Meanwhile Joseph Houseal, a choreographer and dance preservationist, investigated Bhutanese cham dances, and noninvasive ways to record them. “People came to trust us, and they let us see secret things,” he said. “We revived four dances and saved one from extinction that was only known to one person in his 80s.”
Photo: Heloisa Oliveira [fuente]
nytimes.com/slideshow/2008/02/ ... 224-EMER_6.html

Phantoms of Broadway: The Season That Wasn’t

The New York Times, February 24, 2008

By CAMPBELL ROBERTSON

[Alastair Muir]
Summer Strallen and Ewan McGregor in the revival of “Guys and Dolls” in London. Plans to transfer this production to Broadway have stalled.
Alastair Muir
Summer Strallen and Ewan McGregor in the revival of “Guys and Dolls” in London. Plans to transfer this production to Broadway have stalled. [fuente]
nytimes.com/2008/02/24/theater/24robe.html

IN a parallel universe you could be deciding tonight whether to try to score a hard-to-get ticket to Annette Bening’s play or Spike Lee’s Broadway directorial debut, or to grovel for a spare ticket to Jake Gyllenhaal’s Off Broadway play. Or, in a season heavy with musical revivals, whether to take in “Pal Joey” or “Guys and Dolls.”

This was, at one point, a real possibility for spring ’08. But though most of these shows may still reach New York, they obviously aren’t here now. What happened?

Putting up a Broadway show is like staging a giant musical number in the middle of a hailstorm with people who don’t speak the same language, have different agendas and all too often are sworn enemies. Agents, actors, directors, theater owners, union officials and investors have to line up and dance in unison.

“Delays are a normal part of the process,” said Rocco Landesman, president of Jujamcyn Theaters. “When a date is announced as an opening date, it’s really a hoped-for date. When a show arrives perfectly on schedule, that’s actually more anomalous.”

So consider the following phantom calendar — a gallery of the postponed and the canceled — less as a freak show than as a portrait of Broadway business as usual (which, granted, still makes it a bit of a freak show).

Of course it’s not an exhaustive list. If you had a dime for every show with declared Broadway aspirations, you could put on a full production of “Young Frankenstein” in your kitchen.

There are always a half-dozen or so maybes in each season, shows that are assumed to have Broadway intentions simply because of the scale of the project or the pedigree of those involved.

This season that category includes musicals like Trevor Nunn’s production of “Porgy and Bess,” a Des McAnuff-directed revival of “The Wiz,” and “13,” a Jason Robert Brown musical about junior high school students (performed by an all-teenage cast). Even before these shows opened out of town there were public and private noises about their coming to Broadway, though none of them announced specific dates. But aiming a show for Broadway is an exercise in patience not precision. So while none of the three shows are in New York yet, that does not mean they aren’t still Broadway bound (though “Porgy and Bess,” which is in the casting process, and “13,” which has a run in May at the Norma Terris Theater in Connecticut, are more likely at this point).

A possible Broadway transfer of Michael Grandage’s hit production of “Guys and Dolls” in London and a long-awaited revival of “Pal Joey” were assembling casts. “Pal Joey” was the next scheduled tenant for the Richard Rodgers Theater after the Disney show “Tarzan,” and “Guys and Dolls” was aiming for the St. James Theater. Casting difficulties and other problems kept those shows from opening. While “Pal Joey” will probably make it here, perhaps next year, that revival of “Guys and Dolls” is pretty much a dead letter. But neither of those productions were ever formally announced.

“Stalag 17” and “The Female of the Species,” on the other hand, two projects with sparkling marquee names attached, were.

The producers of the revival of “Stalag 17,” the 1951 prisoner-of-war comedy-drama, understood that Mr. Lee was a major name as a director but decided they needed a big star (or two or three) to help sell tickets. They began sending out feelers to agents last fall. This was around the time that the Hollywood writers’ strike was gearing up. Worse, there was — and still is — the possibility of a strike by the Screen Actors Guild and the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists, or both, when the contracts for those unions expire this summer.

“The bigger, more in-demand names were all trying to book as many films back to back as they could,” said Peter Bogyo, a general manager with the Sprecher Organization, which is producing “Stalag 17.”

Without a star attached it’s hard to raise money from investors. So in October the producers postponed the production to the fall of 2008, when they imagined the labor situation in Hollywood would be clearer. (The death last month of Michael Abbott, the producer who had been driving the revival, did not derail the production, Mr. Bogyo said.)

The Broadway intentions of “The Female of the Species,” a new play by the Australian writer Joanna Murray-Smith, which was to star Ms. Bening, were announced in June. Three months later, citing “personal reasons,” Ms. Bening pulled out, and despite a scramble to recast the role in order to make the production’s pre-Broadway engagement at the Geffen Playhouse in Los Angeles, the producers decided to wait it out.

“Sometimes it’s better to be patient in this business,” said David Richenthal, the lead producer.

So they were. Ms. Bening is now back in, and the play is scheduled for the Geffen in the fall and Broadway in the spring of 2009, a delay of almost a year. But a wait that long doesn’t come free of charge.

“When you delay there are some costs that are incurred,” Mr. Richenthal said. “Some of them you can get back a year later. Some of them have to be absorbed by the producers, which will make the production more expensive but not prohibitively so.”

The play did lose its director, Michael Mayer, whose schedule has filled up. He has not been replaced.

Off Broadway two of the most anticipated shows of the season were “The Starry Messenger” by Kenneth Lonergan, to be directed by Mr. Lonergan and to star his pal Matthew Broderick, at the Manhattan Theater Club; and “Farragut North” by Beau Willimon at the Second Stage theater.

“Starry” was postponed partly because Mr. Lonergan needed more time to finish a movie, “Margaret,” which he wrote and directed (the same reason, incidentally, that the play was dropped from the 2006-7 season at the Old Globe Theater in San Diego, where its premiere was initially scheduled). The fate of “Starry” is, so to speak, still up in the air.

But the tale of “Farragut North” is as circuitous and unpredictable as this year’s presidential election.

“There was,” said Jeffrey Richards, the play’s lead producer, “a state of honorable confusion.”

“Farragut,” a play about the idealism and disillusionment of electoral politics, was written by a young author and former Howard Dean campaign aide, Mr. Willimon. Mr. Richards read it and wanted to bring it to Broadway in the 2008-9 season, perhaps with an out-of-town engagement first.

Mr. Gyllenhaal and the director James Lapine participated in a reading, reports of which surfaced in The New York Post, but at that point the play was in a state of flux. Within days the Off Broadway theater Second Stage announced that “Farragut” would be part of its 2007-8 lineup, and the theater started searching for directors. Mr. Gyllenhaal had never officially signed on.

At some point, however, Mike Nichols read the play and wanted to direct it. On Broadway.

So “Farragut North” was now out of the already announced Second Stage schedule and back to opening on Broadway. Plans for a movie version of the play, starring Leonardo DiCaprio, were announced around this time as well.

But Mr. Nichols, who had never formally signed on, did not end up pursuing the Broadway production. And after all the buzz, Mr. Gyllenhaal was out as well.

So where are we now? According to Mr. Richards: Opening on Broadway in the fall. Doug Hughes directing. “Exciting people” in the cast.

nytimes.com/2008/02/24/theater/24robe.html

A preview of some of the themes you’ll be noticing in theaters this season

The New York Times, February 24, 2008

Some Kids, Some Stars, Some Season

By THE NEW YORK TIMES

[Sara Krulwich/The New York Times]
A scene from “Sunday in the Park With George,” a Roundabout production at Studio 54.
Sara Krulwich/The New York Times
A scene from “Sunday in the Park With George,” a Roundabout production at Studio 54. [fuente]
nytimes.com/2008/02/24/theater/24theme.html

[La Jolla Playhouse]
More Baltimore teenagers in the 1950s: “Cry-Baby,” based on the John Waters film of the same name, will open on Broadway on April 24.
La Jolla Playhouse
More Baltimore teenagers in the 1950s: “Cry-Baby,” based on the John Waters film of the same name, will open on Broadway on April 24. [fuente]
nytimes.com/2008/02/24/theater/24theme.html

[Keith Pattison]
Denis Conway, left, and Garrett Lombard in “The Walworth Farce,” which played the Edinburgh Festival Fringe and is set for St. Ann’s Warehouse.
Keith Pattison
Denis Conway, left, and Garrett Lombard in “The Walworth Farce,” which played the Edinburgh Festival Fringe and is set for St. Ann’s Warehouse. [fuente]
nytimes.com/2008/02/24/theater/24theme.html

[Courtesy of the Cecil Beaton Studio Archive/Sotheby’s]
Louise Nevelson, the subject of “Edward Albee’s Occupant,” opening in May at Signature Theater.
Courtesy of the Cecil Beaton Studio Archive/Sotheby’s
Louise Nevelson, the subject of “Edward Albee’s Occupant,” opening in May at Signature Theater. [fuente]
nytimes.com/2008/02/24/theater/24theme.html

A preview of some of the themes you’ll be noticing in theaters this season.

Divas by the Bunch, Nestling Into Place for the Season

Time for a new autograph book: Divas (and at least one divo) are converging on the New York theater. These performers earn their titles because they just seem bigger: bigger talent, bigger personalities, bigger than life.

First there’s Patti LuPone, a diva’s diva. She stars as Momma Rose in the new Broadway revival of “Gypsy,” which begins previews March 3 and opens March 27 at the St. James Theater. Ms. LuPone’s performance was seen earlier in the Encores! Summer Stars series. The regular Encores! concert series also has an opening on March 27: the musical “Juno,” at City Center and starring Victoria Clark. Her work in “The Light in the Piazza” minted her as a major new diva in 2005.

Harvey Fierstein, a divo of long standing, is the star and book writer of “A Catered Affair,” which begins previews on March 25 at the Walter Kerr Theater, with an opening on April 17. The show could also help Faith Prince, missing from Broadway since 2002, burnish her own diva reputation.

And then there’s a preview to this parade. “I’ve gone to musicals since I was 4, and I’ve always gravitated toward strong, leading-women roles,” Alan Palmer said. That’s why he will pay tribute to 18 actresses, including Ms. LuPone, in his solo piece, “Fabulous Divas of Broadway,” opening at St. Luke’s Theater on Wednesday. “If a woman has one incredible, show-stopping number, then people really latch onto it,” he said. MARK BLANKENSHIP

In the 2008 Theater Yearbook, High Schoolers Have a Lock on Most Popular

As a wise philosopher once noted, life is a lot like high school. And so, these days, is the New York stage. Already “Grease,” “Hairspray” and “Spring Awakening” are taking attendance on Broadway. And now Liz Flahive is stepping into the breach for the Manhattan Theater Club (after Kenneth Lonergan’s “Starry Messenger” was dropped from the schedule) with her black comedy “From Up Here.”

Ms. Flahive, whose former day job was as a beauty editor at prom-night primers like Lucky and Teen People magazines, still writes odes to eyeliner to get by. But despite her play’s high school setting, “those two parts of my life are very separate,” she said. “To me as a young writer with young characters, it’s all about the interplay between your school life and your family life,” and high school appeals to audiences in general “because it’s a pretty dramatic place.” “From Up Here” opens April 16, with Julie White playing the mother of a troubled teenager (Tobias Segal).

Then the musical “Saved,” starring Celia Keenan-Bolger (a graduate of “The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee”) and based on the 2004 movie, aims to do for American Eagle Christian High School what “Grease” did for Rydell High. It opens at Playwrights Horizons just before summer break, on June 3.

Joining “Hairspray” on Broadway is a show based on another film by the eternal bad boy John Waters: “Cry-Baby,” which opens on April 24. It too features Baltimore teenagers in the ’50s.

Deirdre O’Connor’s “Jailbait,” part of the mentor project at the Cherry Lane Theater and running May 6-17, is a quieter meditation on the age of cluelessness. CELIA McGEE

Playwrights, Beware: Here Come All Those Novelists

Attention, students: If you want to skip a few reading assignments, just go to the theater, where American authors are as prominent this spring as they are in sophomore English.

We begin with Mark Twain. His comedy “Is He Dead?” has been running on Broadway since November, and he’s a character in Cinna Productions’ “Mark Twain’s Blues,” playing through March 8 at Altered Stages. In “Blues” Twain is giving a lecture when his own characters start interrupting, insisting they’ve been misrepresented.

And then there’s Ernest Hemingway, whose Spanish Civil War drama “The Fifth Column” begins previews Tuesday at the Mint Theater. “If you scratch just a little, you find that most great writers aspired to success on the stage,” said Jonathan Bank, the Mint’s artistic director.

Not all novelists need to write their own plays to get produced, however. For its April production at New York Theater Workshop, Elevator Repair Service will stage the first section of William Faulkner’s “Sound and the Fury,” and their script will change almost nothing from the original text. Faithful in spirit, if not in form, is “Cat’s Cradle,” a musical spin on Kurt Vonnegut’s novel that’s being presented by Untitled Theater Company #61. The show, which opened Saturday at Walkerspace in SoHo, turns the book’s satire of religion and science into a passion play. “There can be a stylistic shift in the work, in terms of realizing that prose is stageable,” said Edward Einhorn, who wrote the book and lyrics and directed the production. MARK BLANKENSHIP

What Plays in Scotland Doesn't Just Stay in Scotland

When Broadway producers search for talent abroad, their first stop is London. But for artistic directors of large Off Broadway theaters, the overseas search has increasingly led to Edinburgh, where every summer the behemoth Edinburgh Festival Fringe presents more than 2,000 potential hits.

Peter Tear, the executive producer of 59E59 Theaters — which produces “East to Edinburgh,” a sneak peek at a few shows going to the next Fringe — has been a driving force behind the increased American focus on that August festival. “I’ve been going to the festival for decades,” Mr. Tear said, “and the standards have really gone up.”

Several former Fringe hits are to open in New York this spring, including Enda Walsh’s black comedy “The Walworth Farce,” which starts previews at St. Ann’s Warehouse on April 15. James Braly’s comic one-man piece “Life in a Marital Institution,” which was a Fringe entry last year, is running through March 16 at 59E59 Theaters. “Looking Up,” a romance involving a trapeze artist that was at the 2002 Fringe, recently opened at Theater for the New City.

The Fringe has been pushing shows to New York for years, but recently it has more aggressively courted American companies to come to Edinburgh. The evidence is in the numbers: the Fringe there last year featured more American acts than the New York International Fringe Festival.

“Producing yourself or your show at the Fringe is one way to invest in your career,” Mark Russell, the artistic director of the experimental Under the Radar festival in New York, said in an e-mail message. “It’s a step between graduate school and the real world.” JASON ZINOMAN

When the Artists Become the Muses

Her sculptures crept almost as high as stage sets, her fur eyelashes were double diva, her self-regard seemingly gargantuan. Onstage, where she’ll be played by Mercedes Ruehl in “Edward Albee’s Occupant” at Signature Theater starting May 6, the artist Louise Nevelson becomes Mr. Albee’s “fourth tall woman — a great artist, a great character and also very human,” said James Houghton, the artistic director of the Signature.

Mr. Albee’s Nevelson joins a veritable kick line of painters, sculptors and photographers, real and imaginary, filling theaters this season. In Nancy Shayne’s musical “Marcy in the Galaxy,” arriving March 28 from the Transport Group, the struggling artist is a sweet 40-something who still has mother issues. “Body Awareness,” an Annie Baker play beginning performances at the Atlantic Theater Company on May 28, tells of a college where the lessons learned have to do with the power of art. Paul Hancock’s “Still Lives,” running April 4 to 19 from SP Theater Productions at the WorkShop Theater, uses art to explore extreme human relationships and predicaments.

Art history makes a vivid appearance in two productions. Written by Lisa Koch and Ted Sod, the musical “27 Rue de Fleurus,” at Urban Stages beginning March 1, lets Alice B. Toklas and Gertrude Stein dive into ditties about Picasso and the rest of the Paris gang. The Abingdon Theater Company’s “Another Vermeer” by Bruce J. Robinson places the infamous art forger Han van Meegeren at the center of a debate about art, truth, money and morality at the end of the Second World War. Performances begin March 29 with a cast including Austin Pendleton.

“It makes sense” that artists interest playwrights, Mr. Houghton said. “They’re always writing from personal experience, and if you’re going to write about the act of creating, of living for your art, what better way to do it?” CELIA McGEE

Live Performance, Virtually Enhanced by the Cinematic Arts

Imagine, if you will, the Tony Award-winning musical of 2108. The set, created entirely by Industrial Light & Magic, is a black box filled with constantly shifting 3-D animation. A virtual orchestra replaces musicians. And as for actors, who needs them? Holograms of Nathan Lane and Patti LuPone will be earning standing ovations.

To some this may seem like a dystopian nightmare. But we’ve been inching toward it, and maybe that’s not an entirely bad thing. In the last few years Broadway set designers have experimented with increasingly sophisticated animation and projections, to mixed results. But perhaps no Broadway show has so ably integrated computer-generated animation and real, old-fashioned sets as “Sunday in the Park With George,” a Roundabout Theater Company production at Studio 54. Its director, Sam Buntrock, points to the future with virtual characters, like an animated dog that gets some of the evening’s biggest laughs.

Experimental theater got there first. The Builders Association, a theater company, has worked with virtual animation since 1998, and its cinematic shows, featuring floating screens, virtual actors and voice-overs, often raise the question of what live theater really means. Its artistic director, Marianne Weems, sees the trend as inevitable. “The line between ‘screen culture’ (or virtual culture) and real life is becoming increasingly blurred,” she wrote in an e-mail message. “It’s a side effect of the 21st century.” JASON ZINOMAN

nytimes.com/2008/02/24/theater/24theme.html

"In the Heights" Broadway's New Beat

The Wall Street Journal, February 23, 2008 -- 1:16 a.m. EST
WEEKEND EDITION

Producers eager to find Broadway's next "Rent" are betting on "In the Heights" -- an edgy New York story with the potential for commercial success. They're also taking a significant risk in calculating that traditional theater crowds will flock to a musical that draws heavily on salsa and hip-hop music. The Journal looks inside the lead-up to opening night.

February 23, 2008

Broadway's New Beat

'In the Heights' mixes hip-hop, salsa and show tunes. Its producers are hoping it will be the next 'Rent.' Inside the lead-up to opening night.

Associate conductor Zachary Dietz, music director Alex Lacamoire and actress Mandy Gonzalez
Associate conductor Zachary Dietz, music director Alex Lacamoire and actress Mandy Gonzalez [fuente]
online.wsj.com/article/SB12037 ... 9091786783.html

Lin-Manuel Miranda on stage and Alex Lacamoire in the orchestra pit
Lin-Manuel Miranda on stage and Alex Lacamoire in the orchestra pit [fuente]
online.wsj.com/article/SB12037 ... 9091786783.html

Mandy Gonzalez and Christopher Jackson
Mandy Gonzalez and Christopher Jackson [fuente]
online.wsj.com/article/SB12037 ... 9091786783.html

THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
online.wsj.com/home

By JOHN JURGENSEN
February 23, 2008; Page W1

"Don't roll your pinky first like Fosse," choreographer Andy Blankenbuehler chides a group of dancers as they practice a hip-hop routine in a mirrored rehearsal room above Times Square.
They are weeks away from the Broadway opening of "In the Heights," a new musical that blends rap and Latin music to tell the story of a changing neighborhood in New York. The work of 28-year-old Lin-Manuel Miranda, the show's creator, composer, lyricist and star, the show has won attention as a fresh take on urban Latino life with a unique, exuberant sound. Its producers are betting on it as Broadway's next "Rent" -- an edgy, original work with the potential to become a commercial success. They are also taking a significant risk, calculating that they can sell traditional theater crowds on a musical that draws heavily on salsa and hip-hop.

Original material "is the thing that audiences are thirsty for, but the hardest thing to get them to trust," says producer Kevin McCollum.

In a Broadway landscape dominated by big-budget revivals and movie remakes, many producers are eager to find shows they can own from the start. Original shows lack brand recognition but they can bring a bigger payoff if they blossom into hits. The producers of "In the Heights" are veterans of other offbeat Broadway successes, including "Avenue Q," "The Drowsy Chaperone" and "Rent." They have invested $10 million in "In the Heights," which is moving to Broadway after a six-month run off-Broadway last year.

Earlier this month, members of the 27-person cast squeezed into a low-ceilinged, fluorescent-lit room for the first pre-Broadway run-through with the full band. Heavy on congas, claves and other percussion instruments, the band launched into "96,000," one of the first act's biggest numbers, in which characters take turns fantasizing about the jackpot from a mysterious winning lottery ticket.

As a keyboard player vamped, Mr. Miranda rhymed:
"It's silly when we get into these crazy hypotheticals.
If you really want some bread then go ahead create a set of goals,
And cross them off the list as you pursue 'em.
And with those 96 I know precisely what I'm doin'."
The production has gotten bigger since its off-Broadway run, which drew praise from many critics and shared a win for best musical at the Lucille Lortel Awards for off-Broadway shows. A strong following has developed online, especially among young theatergoers tracking the show's progress.

For the move from a 500-seat theater to the 1,500-seat Richard Rodgers Theatre near Times Square, dance numbers were transposed for a deeper stage. The set, depicting the upper Manhattan neighborhood of Washington Heights with a silhouette of the George Washington Bridge and tenements cross-hatched with fire escapes, was rebuilt to taller proportions. With a beefed up horn section, the band has grown from seven members to 13. Mr. Miranda wrote three new songs to flesh out the second act, and the music director, Alex Lacamoire, orchestrated bigger crescendos to maximize the drama.

The producers created a $350,000 commercial that's been running in New York during shows like "Good Morning America," and will spend about $80,000 weekly on advertising. To lower the perceived risk for potential ticket buyers, prices will start at about $22, and front-row seats will be sold off by lottery for $26.50 a couple hours before each show.

"If we don't succeed in selling this to the traditional Broadway musical-theatergoer, there won't be a show for anybody else," says producer Jeffrey Seller.

Making sure the show rings true for Hispanic audiences is also a priority. At a rehearsal in January, Mr. Lacaoire, whose parents were born in Cuba, corrected the singers on their pronunciation as they sang the words, "in Washington Heights" in the title song.

"It's not 'Washington.' It's 'Washing-tone,'" he said, emphasizing a Spanish accent.

The show is sprinkled with Spanish dialogue, including a slogan of sorts that appears on T-shirts for sale in the lobby: "No pare, sigue, sigue!" It's a rallying cry that translates roughly as "Don't stop, keep going, keep going!"

"In the Heights" follows only a handful of Broadway musicals that have drawn heavily on Hispanic culture. In the past, gang life has been a recurring theme, from "West Side Story" to Paul Simon's 1998 musical, "The Capeman," which was based on the true story of a Puerto Rican gang member. It was panned by critics and closed in two months.

The story of "In the Heights" centers on Usnavi, a young Dominican who's tied down to a cramped grocery store he inherited from his parents. A constellation of characters orbit the bodega, including Usnavi's crush, the lovely, restless Vanessa. The neighborhood golden girl, Nina, returns home with doubts about her scholarship to Stanford. At the taxi dispatch service, Benny, a non-Latino, tries vainly to win approval from his Puerto Rican boss. Women in a salon swap gossip and a man pushing a "piragua" cart sells icy treats to cut the heat. Over two acts depicting a July 4th weekend, love develops, a family stumbles, and the neighborhood confronts a blackout and threats to its character.

The story has some autobiographical touches for Mr. Miranda, who plays Usnavi. He grew up on 200th Street, just north of Washington Heights. His father, a political consultant, and his mother, a psychologist, immigrated to New York from Puerto Rico. Each summer they sent him there to stay with his grandparents. During the school year, he took a bus out of his neighborhood every day to attend the prestigious Hunter College High School, a competitive-admission public school on the Upper East Side.

"I had a foot in all of these worlds and didn't know which was mine," he says.

In the cassette deck of his family's Subaru, his parents alternated the Dominican merengue star Juan Luis Guerra with the Broadway soundtrack of "Man of La Mancha."

Meanwhile, Mr. Miranda was getting schooled in rap music as the genre evolved through the early '90s. Mr. Miranda's schoolbus driver, an aspiring rapper, taught his young passengers the three songs he could perform fluently. Mr. Miranda memorized the 1992 debut album from the Pharcyde, which broke ground with funny, self-deprecating rhymes.

He began to distill his musical influences at Wesleyan University in Connecticut. In December 1999, as a college sophomore, he began writing a musical to fill a slot he'd scored at the student theater. Staged in April the next year, the show was a rough precursor of what "In the Heights" would become.

A script and recording reached recent Wesleyan graduate Thomas Kail, who had formed a production team with two friends. Mr. Kail thought the show's charismatic narrator and hip-hop delivery were promising ingredients, but had to wait a couple years to pursue the project. "We circled the date on the calendar that Lin graduated," says Mr. Kail, who became the show's director.

In the summer of 2002, they began staging readings, often with a small band, in the basement of the Drama Book Shop in the theater district. Buzz about the workshops drew Jill Furman, a producer who had helped develop "The Drowsy Chaperone." Within two years, Ms. Furman had joined forces with Messrs. McCollum and Seller to sign a production deal for "In the Heights."

They brought on playwright Quiara Alegría Hudes, who worked with Mr. Miranda to rewrite the book for the musical. The two tried to evoke what Ms. Hudes describes as the shifting "tectonic plates" of identity in the show. The characters are torn between familiar streets and big ambitions, family businesses and outside developers, the Caribbean and Manhattan.

"These are all questions I struggled with growing up, and I think the play has gone a long way toward reconciling that," Mr. Miranda says.

Write to John Jurgensen at

URL for this article: online.wsj.com/article/SB12037 ... 9091786783.html

The Whoopee Club Newsletter. Immodest Blaize Show at Koko London

viernes, 22 de febrero de 2008 12:46
Immodesty Blaize at Koko !

The Whoopee Club

JULIAN CLARY
presents
The Immodest Tease Show!
Tuesday March 18th and Wednesday March 19th 2008
KOKO, London NW1
Doors 8pm - Show 9pm - Dancing ‘til late
Starring!
The razor witted JULIAN CLARY!
Miss Exotic World, Reigning Queen of Burlesque, IMMODESTY BLAIZE!
She’s a force of nature, New York’s finest export, DIRTY MARTINI!
The exquisite queen of the fan dance, from Chicago, MICHELLE L’AMOUR!
Las Vegas’ own showgirl supreme, KALANI KOKONUTS!
From the Twin Titties of Minneapolis, the larger than life, FOXY TANN!
With live accompaniment from the BLAIZE BIG BAND!
Musical Director: The legendary BARRY ADAMSON!
And introducing
Hottest dance troupe sensation THE CHOCOLATE CHICK COOKIES!
Plus
Special guests and surprises!

After show party hosted by ‘The REAL Queen of England’ JODIE HARSH!
HOW TO BOOK:
Online immodestyblaize.com
koko.uk.com
Box Office 0870 145 1115 Standing ticket £30 Grand Tier standing ticket £50

immodestyblaize.com

KOKO can be found at:
1A Camden High Street,
London,
NW1 7JE
Click here for a full street map>
koko.uk.com

Blaize KOKO

Video Musical: Weapon of Choice (Augusto César Lapeyre)

viernes, 22 de febrero de 2008 10:51
Clip de Christopher Walken

Augusto César Lapeyre

Me encanta Christopher Walken y este clip del 2001.

Fatboy Slim, Weapon of Choice
Fatboy Slim, Weapon of Choice [fuente]

20.02.08
Fatboy Slim, Weapon of Choice

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ICWbPeG6QwU (video no disponible)

Sobre Walken: es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christopher_Walken

Augusto.

¡ Qué bueno Profe !, ¡ Muchas gracias por el aporte !
- Bailador ! En la página de Wikipedia citada aparece la siguiente información:
"También actuó en tres videos musicales. En su primer video hizo de "Angel de la muerte" en "Bad Girl" de Madonna en 1993, su segunda actuación en videoclips fue en "Breakin' Down" de la banda de Heavy Metal, Skid Row; y el tercero fue "Weapon of Choice" de Fatboy Slim en 2001, este último el más exitoso y premiado, fue dirigido por Spike Jonze, director de Cómo ser John Malkovich (1999) y de videos musicales de bandas como Weezer, R.E.M. y Beastie Boys entre otras".

“Sunday in the Park With George” at Studio 54, NYC

The New York Sun, 22 February 2008

Tableau Vivant

Young director Sam Buntrock tackles both Sondheim and Seurat in high-tech splendor, Eric Grode writes.

Eric Grode

[JOAN MARCUS]
STILL LIFE Alison Horowitz, Jessica Molaskey, Drew McVety, Brynn O’Malley, Jessica Grove, Daniel Evans, Michael Cumpsty, and Jenna Russell in ‘Sunday in the Park with George.’
JOAN MARCUS
STILL LIFE Alison Horowitz, Jessica Molaskey, Drew McVety, Brynn O’Malley, Jessica Grove, Daniel Evans, Michael Cumpsty, and Jenna Russell in ‘Sunday in the Park with George.’ [fuente]

[THE GALLERY COLLECTION/CORBIS]
Georges Seurat, ‘Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte’ (1884–86).
THE GALLERY COLLECTION/CORBIS
Georges Seurat, ‘Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte’ (1884–86). [fuente]

Sunday in the Park with George officially opened on Thursday, February 21, 2008 at Studio 54
Sunday in the Park with George officially opened on Thursday, February 21, 2008 at Studio 54 [fuente]
broadwayworld.com/viewcolumn.cfm?colid=25392

[Sara Krulwich/The New York Times]
Jenna Russell and Daniel Evans in a revival of the Sondheim-Lapine musical “Sunday in the Park With George” at Studio 54.
Sara Krulwich/The New York Times
Jenna Russell and Daniel Evans in a revival of the Sondheim-Lapine musical “Sunday in the Park With George” at Studio 54. [fuente]
theater2.nytimes.com/2008/02/2 ... ews/22geor.html

Has any artist ever e n c a p s u l a t e d both the exhilaration and the loneliness of creation as succinctly and sublimely as Stephen Sondheim did in “Finishing the Hat,” from his and James Lapine’s problematic 1985 masterpiece “Sunday in the Park With George”? Here’s Georges Seurat as he defends, exults in, and very possibly regrets an obsession with his painting that has driven away his model and lover:

Mapping out a sky,
What you feel like, planning a sky,
What you feel when voices that
come
Through the window
Go
Until they distance and die,
Until there’s nothing but sky
In this visually rapturous revival, fresh from acclaimed British runs at the Menier Chocolate Factory and the West End, director Sam Buntrock has mapped out his very own sky with a wizardly sense of stagecraft and an emotional rigor that belies his age of 32. Mr. Buntrock has reimagined the creation of Seurat’s pointillist “Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte,” flooding David Farley’s spare set with computer graphics and more conventional animation — and the effect, even to the seen-it-all audiences of the 21st century, is almost as ravishing as the painting itself.
Mitigated only somewhat by merely adequate lead performances from Daniel Evans and Jenna Russell, both of whom have accompanied the production from London, this revival locates the rigid architecture as well as the emotional underpinnings of this strange and compelling musical. When the artist urges his mother to “watch while I revise the world,” the command has rarely been more accurate. Or more unnecessary: Anyone with a vested interest in seeing how modern technology can augment or even transcend traditional stagings will find it difficult to look anywhere else. The first act, longer and considerably more engaging, chronicles the efforts of the 26-year-old Seurat (Mr. Evans) to create “La Grande Jatte,” a sprawling (more than 72 square feet), perspectiveshattering array of soldiers, boatmen, shopgirls, servants, and other Sunday strollers on the picturesque Parisian island. A maniacally focused Georges contends with grumpy models, nay-saying fellow artists, and the emotional demands of the aptly named Dot (Ms. Russell), who adores him but struggles to engage with him on any meaningful emotional level. Her failure — and Georges’s triumph — culminates in the climactic re-creation of the painting, right down to the misaligned shadows and sniffing mutt.
The fine-voiced supporting cast plays a large role in creating this tableau (Mary Beth Peil and Michael Cumpsty are wonderful as Georges’s mother and friendly rival, respectively), but the marvel of this “Sunday” comes in Mr. Buntrock’s stunning animations. A set of onstage curtains miraculously morphs into trees, shadows shift and lengthen as Georges’s sessions drag on, and the blackand-white sketches take on added color and depth in almost imperceptible gradations. Yet except for a few brief and entirely appropriate sight gags, Mr. Buntrock never allows these masterful images to overshadow the plot or music. It is a joy to experience.
Seurat used only 12 colors — never black — on “La Grande Jatte,” assuming correctly that the eye would commingle the dots abutting one another. (He called the style not pointillism but divisionism.) And as even the most rudimentary piano lesson points out, Western music is predicated on just 12 notes.
Mr. Sondheim’s sumptuous score, therefore, frequently replicates the painter’s style by employing a piercing, arpeggiated sound. This occurs both in the underscoring and, through a dazzling example of subtext surging to the surface, as Georges stabs at the canvas while articulating an individual dot of color with every stuttered syllable.
But Mr. Sondheim — who had previously composed an entire score in variations of 3/4 time (“A Little Night Music”) and refracted his melodic sense through traditional Japanese harmonies and instrumentations (“Pacific Overtures”) — doesn’t force the issue. “Sunday” is filled with spare but haunting chords, providing a limpid harmonic ballast for a group of songs that come closer to art songs than those in any other Sondheim musical. (Jason Carr’s orchestrations prove remarkably successful at maintaining that sound for just five instruments, even in the acoustically punishing Studio 54.)
The stand-alone quality of many of these songs stems in part from a certain flimsiness in terms of plotting. Messrs. Sondheim and Lapine originally envisioned “Sunday” as an extended one-act; a modern-day second act wasn’t added until the last three performances of its original off-Broadway run, and it was very much a work in progress during Broadway previews. The graft is not a seamless one: Through a whirlwind of emotional epiphanies, Georges’s great-grandson, a conceptual artist named George (Mr.
Evans again), reconnects with the artistic impulse through the nudgings of Dot’s daughter, Marie (Ms. Russell), now a feisty 98-year-old, and a time-hopping visit from Dot herself back on La Grande Jatte.
The production’s provenance adds a dynamic crucial to so many British productions: class. Dot’s pungent Cockney accent heightens the disparity between her and her well-to-do lover. (Seurat never sold a painting during his brief lifetime — and apparently didn’t need to.) When she gets pregnant, it quickly becomes clear that her future Sundays in the park will not be spent with Georges.
Sadly, the emotional punch that should pulse through duets such as “We Do Not Belong Together” remains muffled here. The tumultuous response that greeted their London performances notwithstanding, Ms. Russell and especially Mr. Evans have yet to create characterizations strong enough to overcome the skeletal second act, let alone counteract Mr. Buntrock’s captivating visuals.
Ms. Russell has a melting soprano, a formidable chest voice (eerily similar to that of Bernadette Peters, the original Dot) and, whether she’s wearily examining a trace of upper-arm flab in the mirror or staring incredulously at a man who can’t look at his own daughter, a touching reserve as Dot. But she falls back on a few calculated (and admittedly enjoyable) comic bits as the spunky Marie and seems misdirected during Dot’s final appearance. And the infectious spark crucial to making Seurat’s obsession even remotely sympathetic remains out of Mr. Evans’s reach, a problem that he attempts to remedy with an unconvincingly glib George in Act II. Mr. Lapine’s spare concluding words dovetail beautifully with a gorgeous final image of Mr. Buntrock’s creation. The word “breathtaking” comes to mind — but perhaps this is because Mr. Evans’s George, upon seeing it, audibly takes a delighted breath. This cloying moment represents a rare misstep for Mr. Buntrock, who has created a production that will be remembered long after any casting quibbles have faded away. He has mapped out not only a sky but the sad, splintered, and improbably hopeful world underneath it — and “Sunday” is richer for it.

Until June 1 (254 W. 54th St., between Broadway and Eighth Avenue, 212-719-1300).

Links:

sundayintheparkonbroadway.com

Broadway World.com: broadwayworld.com/viewcolumn.cfm?colid=25392

The New York Times: theater2.nytimes.com/2008/02/2 ... ews/22geor.html

Tap from Quebec: Rapaillé by Zogma at the Ailey Citigroup Theater

The New York Times, February 22, 2008
Dance Review | [Zogma]

Step Dancing to the Lively Rhythms of a French Canadian Poet

By JENNIFER DUNNING

ZOGMA
COLLECTIF DE FOLKLORE URBAIN
ZOGMA
COLLECTIF DE FOLKLORE URBAIN [fuente]
zogma.ca

There was the seed of a good show in “Rapaillé,” performed by [Zogma] on Wednesday night at the Ailey Citigroup Theater. Founded in 1999 and based in Quebec, the company describes itself as an urban folk collective devoted to the old French Canadian tradition of step dancing.

The five dancers are full of attractive youthful energy, and they certainly know how to move. The musicians, Marie-Pierre Lecault (fiddle) and Julien Roy (percussion), are appropriately unobtrusive but not invisible. Step dancing can be electric in its energy and rigor, but somehow this hourlong show did not quite work.

One problem may have been the difficulties of building an entire program around step dancing, which requires a taut torso, precisely churning and beating feet that seldom travel, and arms used essentially for balance rather than ornamentation or expressive purposes. The exuberance of the performers and the sheer excitement of which the form is capable nearly banish the thought that this is tap dancing for the anal-retentive.

The best moments in the program, presented by the 92nd Street Y Harkness Dance Festival, occurred when the five dancers simply did their stuff, as is generally also true of tap revues. The worst occurred when the show tried to squeeze itself into an awkward format, moving through all the seasons in choreography by Dominic Desrochers and Frédérique-Annie Robitaille.

And the poet to whom the piece paid tribute, Gaston Miron, was ill served by the breathless taped narration, by Paul Hopkins. (Lines like “I hurl volleys of hatred shavings at you” suggested that the translations might also be at fault.) The company also included Yaël Azoulay, Anita Rudichuk and Ian Yaworsky.

[Zogma] performs through Sunday at the Ailey Citigroup Theater, West 55th Street, at Ninth Avenue, Clinton; (212) 415-5500, 92Y.org/HarknessFestival.

nytimes.com/2008/02/22/arts/dance/22hark.html

Links:

Link: zogma.ca

Hay fotos y videos

Clases de Theater-Jazz y Jazz-Dance 2008 (Bettina Toyos)

jueves, 21 de febrero de 2008 11:02
LES PASO HORARIOS DE MIS CLASES DE THEATER-JAZZ Y JAZZ-DANCE EN 2008...EN OTRO ESTUDIO DE DANZAS!!!

Bettina Toyos

HOLA A TODOS/AS!!!!

PARA LOS QUE NO ESTAN AL TANTO...LES CUENTO QUE DESPUES DE 20° AÑOS EL
GIMNASIO LA CASA CERRÓ SUS PUERTAS...POR LO QUE ME VI OBLIGADA AL IGUAL
QUE LOS RESTANTES PROFESORES A EMIGRAR PARA OTRO ESTUDIO!!!

EL ESTUDIO SE LLAMA "NEW LIFE"...QUEDA EN JUNCAL 3591 1° PISO, ESQUINA
AV.R.SCALABRINI ORTIZ (EX-CANNING)...QUEDA A 2 CUADRAS DE AV.LAS HERAS Y 2
CUADRAS DE AV.SANTA FE...EL SALON ES GRANDE Y CUENTA CON EL PISO ADECUADO
PARA LA DANZA...IGUAL A LOS QUE VERIAN TOMANDO CLASES EN EEUU!!!

SON 2 PISOS...Y SE REFACCIONARA PARA DANZA EL 2° PISO DURANTE EL MES DE
MARZO...POR LO QUE HASTA ABRIL TENDRE POCOS HORARIOS, QUE SE AMPLIARAN EN
ABRIL !!!

FEBRERO: MARTES Y JUEVES A LAS 20:00 HS.

MARZO: NIVEL PRINCIP./PRINCIP.ADVANCES: MARTES Y JUEVES 20 HS.
NIVEL INTERMEDIO: LUNES Y MIERCOLES 21 HS.

LOS ESPERO PARA SEGUIR BAILANDO Y HACIENDO SHOWS!!!...COMO LOS 3 QUE
HICIMOS DURANTE 2007...Y QUE PUEDEN VER LAS COREOGRAFÍAS EN:
YOUTUBE.COM.AR....."SHOW 2007 BETTINA TOYOS"

BESOS A TODOS/AS!!!

Bettina Toyos
PROF.NACIONAL DE DANZAS Y MIEMBRO DE LA C.I.A.D.

Gracias Bettina por mantenernos informados de tus actividades !

De Clases Tango Borquez y de Próximo Baile (Enrique Carmona)

jueves, 21 de febrero de 2008 07:17
Newsletter Aerolatino-Geba exclusiva para suscriptores, mie 20 febrero 2008

Enrique Carmona

AMIGO AUGUSTO, SI DIOS QUIERE, PRONTO NOS VEREMOS EN LAS CLASES DE BORQUEZ, TENEMOS QUE PONERNOS AL DIA CON EL 2 X 4.- EXTRAÑAMOS OTRA FIESTITA COMO LA QUE HICIMOS EN DICIEMBRE EN LA CONFITERIA DE SAN MARTIN. TE MANDO UN GRAN ABRAZO Y HASTA PRONTO. ENRIQUE CARMONA.-

Sí, de acuerdo. Enrique! Un corte, una quebrada, una corridita !
Ariel Lichtig se está ocupando del tema Cena y Baile y nos avisará tan pronto se confirme.

Cena y Baile, 28dic2007, Geba Sección San Martín, Palermo:

Cena y Baile viernes 28diciembre2007, en Geba San Martín [Foto Cristina Rivera] Cena y Baile viernes 28diciembre2007, en Geba San Martín [Foto Cristina Rivera] Cena y Baile viernes 28diciembre2007, en Geba San Martín [Foto Cristina Rivera] Cena y Baile viernes 28diciembre2007, en Geba San Martín [Foto Cristina Rivera] Cena y Baile viernes 28diciembre2007, en Geba San Martín [Foto Cristina Rivera] Cena y Baile viernes 28diciembre2007, en Geba San Martín [Foto Cristina Rivera] Cena y Baile viernes 28diciembre2007, en Geba San Martín [Foto Cristina Rivera] Cena y Baile viernes 28diciembre2007, en Geba San Martín [Foto Cristina Rivera] Cena y Baile viernes 28diciembre2007, en Geba San Martín [Foto Cristina Rivera] Milongueando en Palermo
Cena y Baile viernes 28diciembre2007, en Geba San Martín [Foto Cristina Rivera] Cena y Baile viernes 28diciembre2007, en Geba San Martín [Foto Cristina Rivera] Cena y Baile viernes 28diciembre2007, en Geba San Martín [Foto Cristina Rivera]

68 Años Haciendo Vestuarios en Broadway

The New York Times, February 21, 2008

Puttin’ on Razzle-Dazzle, One Bead at a Time

By CAMPBELL ROBERTSON

CRANFORD, N.J. — Glitz doesn’t just happen.

[Sylwia Kapuscinski for The New York Times]
Bessie Nelson at her home in Cranford, N.J., beading costumes for “A Chorus Line.”
Sylwia Kapuscinski for The New York Times
Bessie Nelson at her home in Cranford, N.J., beading costumes for “A Chorus Line.” [fuente]
nytimes.com/2008/02/21/theater/21bead.html

[Sylwia Kapuscinski for The New York Times]
Bessie Nelson has been beading Broadway costumes for 68 years.
Sylwia Kapuscinski for The New York Times
Bessie Nelson has been beading Broadway costumes for 68 years. [fuente]
nytimes.com/2008/02/21/theater/21bead.html

Multimedia

A Broadway designer has to come up with the look, the gold glow of the dancers in “A Chorus Line,” say, or the gluttonous kitsch of the showgirls in “The Producers.” But even then, you can’t wear an idea. Somebody actually has to make it.

And quite often that somebody — on Broadway at least — lives and works in a small upstairs bedroom in a modest brick house on an unremarkable residential street here.

She is Bessie Nelson, and she is the go-to beader of Broadway. Meaning Ms. Nelson, 77, spends hours upon hours sticking a needle through fabric stretched taut across two pieces of wood, attaching one No. 4 bugle or No. 6 three-cut copper bead at a time to costumes that will eventually be wildly elaborate works made up of thousands and thousands of beads.

She has done the beadwork on Liberace’s capes, Neil Diamond’s jackets, Michael Jackson’s glove and Cher’s famously revealing, uh, thingies. (“It was only covered in spots that had to be covered, you know,” Ms. Nelson recalled in a Jersey accent you could pour on pancakes.) She did beading for the Broadway productions of “Dreamgirls,” “Sunset Boulevard,” “Miss Saigon,” “Wicked” and “The Boy >From Oz”; she did inaugural-ball gowns for Nancy Reagan ( for the second inauguration) and Hillary Rodham Clinton (the first). She’s currently working on 31 costumes for the national tour of “A Chorus Line.”

“I mean I boggle my own mind when I think about it,” Ms. Nelson said in an interview last week.

In the 68 years she’s being doing this, what she actually does hasn’t changed all that much. “They haven’t found a way yet for a machine to do it,” Ms. Nelson said. Beading still has to be done by hand, bead by bead.

Many of the costume shops used to have staffs of “beading ladies” who would sit around their frames in large rooms, quilting-bee style, gossiping and arguing. Ms. Nelson — who has lived at her sister’s house since the late ’80s, soon after her second husband died — is something of an anomaly, preferring to work behind closed doors, in the company only of her beading frame and the television set.

“There were many more beaders when I first started in the ’70s,” said Suzy Benzinger, a costume designer for “Movin’ Out,” “Miss Saigon” and other Broadway shows. There was Miss Norma and Madame Berthe (as they were known) and all the ladies who worked for Barbara Matera’s legendary costume shop. They’re almost all gone now, and they’re not being replaced. “Kids coming up don’t want to do that,” Ms. Benzinger said. “It takes too much concentration, and it’s too labor intensive.”

Ms. Nelson has four beaders scattered around the country who work for her; there is an excellent beading shop in California, and some top beaders in Paris. There is the woman who lives in the suburbs of San Juan, Puerto Rico. Otherwise a great deal of the beadwork is done these days in China or India. If you have the right connections in Asia, the beadwork there is good for high-end fashion, said the costume designer William Ivey Long, who estimates he has worked with Ms. Nelson on at least 30 shows. But the demands of Broadway are different.

Costumes often have to be put together fast, at the last minute; Ms. Nelson had to do the work on Mr. Long’s wildly complicated Chrysler Building gown, the one Gary Beach wore in “The Producers,” in two weeks. You need someone who has the aesthetic sense to make artistic decisions without having to be told exactly what to do.

With Ms. Nelson, Mr. Long said, “I have put down watercolor and thrown some glitter on it, and said to her, ‘I want it to be somewhat like this.’ ”

Broadway outfits also have to be able to take a licking. What may look beautiful on an haute couture gown might end up leaking beads all over the stage after a week on Broadway. Beadwork done in China and India tends to have this problem. Ms. Nelson’s work, which is not cheap but not out-of-line expensive either ($5,000 to $8,000 for the work on bead-intensive outfits), is famous for being durable.

Ms. Nelson grew up as Bessie Noto, the fourth of six children in an apartment building in Jersey City that was owned by her grandmother and occupied almost exclusively by family. Bessie’s father was a milkman, and her mom was a homemaker, but Aunt Jenny was a beader.

Bessie came down with rheumatic fever when she was 9 and had to spend most of that year at home, being tutored and being bored. She would go over to Aunt Jenny’s apartment and lie under the beading frame while Aunt Jenny worked, watching the patterns slowly emerge. After a few months of looking and learning, Bessie went to work for 25 cents an hour at a local beading shop called Roman Art. She was by far the youngest in the roomful of women doing beadwork for the clothing shops along Seventh Avenue in Manhattan.

Twenty-five years later she left Jersey City for California, but she had barely gotten started. After a few years of working at a bead shop attached to Nolan Miller’s design studio in Beverly Hills, Ms. Nelson and another beader broke off to open their own shop on Sunset Boulevard.

“All of a sudden we got into that little one-room shop, and Jean Louis came and Bill Whitten came, and Bob Mackie came,” Ms. Nelson said, rattling off the names of a few designers.

They brought their clients with them: Lionel Richie, Diana Ross, Cher, the Jackson Five, “The Carol Burnett Show,” everyone on “Dynasty.” (Ms. Nelson has done most of her Broadway work after moving back East in 1988.)

At one point in the interview she reached into a drawer and pulled out a tattered box meant to hold checkbooks; a piece of masking tape ran across the top of the box, upon which was written “Michael Jackson’s Glove.” The glove is red and black and the beading is unfinished. Mr. Jackson did not like the colored gloves, and anyway, this one didn’t fit. He threw it in the garbage, Ms. Nelson said, but she recovered it as a keepsake.

On March 28 at the Hudson Theater on Broadway Ms. Nelson will receive an Irene Sharaff Award from the Theater Development Fund, the so-called artisan award. Artisans usually don’t get awards. Everybody, or at least people whose names are known always say that what’s special about artisans is that they just do great work and don’t need recognition. Well, yes, that’s so special. Tell it to the artisans.

Ms. Nelson said the lack of recognition in her career didn’t bother her, but it clearly does, a little. No mention of her on the plaque next to Mrs. Clinton’s inaugural ball gown in the Smithsonian. She’s been the subject of a few articles in The Cranford Chronicle, and her name shows up in the coffee-table book for “The Producers,” and in a couple of Playbills. But now she’s got this award.

And, of course she’s also got a bunch of “Chorus Line” costumes to finish. Her sister chimed in, It’s going to be a late night.

nytimes.com/2008/02/21/theater/21bead.html

Se Viene la Convención de Ritmos (Romina Samelnik)

miércoles, 20 de febrero de 2008 20:23
PREPARATE!!! SE VIENE LA 5ta CONVENCION DE RITMOS!!

Romina Samelnik


Passing Strange Now Playing Uptown

miércoles, 20 de febrero de 2008 13:14
Passing Strange Newsletter

Bounce-176742-761897

Passing Strange Now Playing Uptown
Passing Strange Now Playing Uptown
passingstrangeonbroadway.com

Don't miss out on this "funk inflected show" (The New Yorker) now at The Belasco Theatre, 111 W. 44th Street (Between Broadway & 6th Ave.), NYC. Click here to Buy Tickets now!

We’ve added one more song to the website! Navigate through the "Youth's" Journey at passingstrangeonbroadway.com and get the chance to hear the sound of "Amsterdam..."

Check out the Broadwayworld feature on cast members from Passing Strange. Click here to see Part 1 or click here to see Part 2 of a 2-part Series introducing this crazy talented cast to theatergoers. Check it out!

passingstrangeonbroadway.com

Spring Awakening 2008 Grammy Award for Best Musical Show Album

martes, 19 de febrero de 2008 17:45
Spring Awakening Newsletter

Spring Awakening

Spring Awakening a New Musical at the Eugene O'Neill Theatre
Spring Awakening a New Musical at the Eugene O'Neill Theatre
springawakening.com

Spring Awakening won the 2008 Grammy Award for Best Musical Show Album on February 10th. Congrats to Duncan Sheik, Steven Sater and the original cast on their rocking win!
Click here to read more.

Ever wonder what Jonathan Groff’s idea of a perfect date is? How about Lea Michele’s first crush? The hottest cast on Broadway dishes about romantic regards and their fabulous firsts!

In honor of Valentine’s Day, Serendipity 3 is offering a decadent desert that is truly the epitome of a guilty pleasure. This sinful sundae will be on the menu through March 12, 2008. Stop by now, before it’s too late!

A new block of tickets are now on sale through August 31, 2008, raising the question: will it be hotter outside or inside the Eugene O’Neill Theatre this summer?

Is love and marriage with robots an institute you can disparage?

martes, 19 de febrero de 2008 15:58
Weekly Review:

Scientific American Newsletters

FEATURE

Not Tonight, Dear, I Have to Reboot

Is love and marriage with robots an institute you can disparage? Computing pioneer David Levy doesn't think so - he expects people to wed droids by midcentury. Is that a good thing?

...

sciam.com/article.cfm?id=not-t ... &sc=WR_20080219

Not Tonight, Dear, I Have to Reboot
Not Tonight, Dear, I Have to Reboot [fuente]

20 Off-Broadway Shows. 20 bucks. 20 minutes before.

martes, 19 de febrero de 2008 13:30
Only $20 to See Altar Boyz and 25 Other Shows

Altar Boyz

ALTAR BOYZ

ALTAR BOYZis proud to be a member of the Off-Broadway community and support this exciting promotion that allows you to see The Best of Off-Broadway for only $20! We also recommend checking THE AWESOME 80S PROM and MY FIRST TIME for only $20 from Monday, February 25 - Sunday, March 9!

20 Off-Broadway Shows. 20 bucks. 20 minutes before.

In the spirit of NYC's Restaurant Week comes 20at20, your chance to see the Best of Off-Broadway for only $20! TWO WEEKS ONLY! 2/25/08 - 3/9/08.
ABSOLUTELY AFFORDABLE!
Here is your chance to catch up with shows you may have missed, get a sneak peek at the next big show, or revisit a favorite - all for only $20 each!
ALWAYS ON!
Since Off-Broadway has performances to fit everyone's schedule, you can see more than one: on Saturday for example, you can see Gazillion Bubble Show at 11 AM, Perfect Crime at 2, Forbidden Broadway at 4, My First Time at 7, and Celia at 9! Where else can you see five shows in one day, for less than the price of ONE BROADWAY TICKET?
WHERE REAL NEW YORKERS GO!
With 20at20, you get a chance to see the next Rent, Avenue Q, A Chorus Line, Doubt, Proof or Spring Awakening - before the prices go 'uptown'. Be part of the New York 'in' crowd and enjoy the original productions in the intimate environment that can only be found Off-Broadway.
HERE'S HOW IT WORKS!
For TWO WEEKS ONLY, from February 25th through March 9th, tickets for all 20at20 shows are only $20, starting 20 minutes before show time. Just go to the box office of the show you want to see 20 minutes before it begins and say, ''20at20." You'll get your ticket to a real New York theater experience!
SEE 5 SHOWS AND GET DINNER ON US!
See any 5 of the participating 20at20 shows from 2/25/08 - 3/9/08 and receive a FREE voucher for dinner for 2 at an area restaurant! Mail in your ticket stubs once you have seen 5 shows and we will send you your voucher while supplies last. Click here for details.
20at20 is only two weeks long! How many shows can you see?
For more on 20at20, visit www.20at20.com. See you Off-Broadway!
Off-Broadway is best with a friend! To tell a friend about 20at20, forward this email or click here.

*No advance purchase. Subject to availability. Offer valid only at box office. Cash only at some venues. Offer may be revoked at any time. Not valid on prior sale.

Défilé Diesel P-A-P, Printemps-été, 2008, Prêt-à-porter

madame.lefigaro.fr/mode/defile ... esel/collection

- Défilé Diesel P-A-P, Printemps-été, 2008, Prêt-à-porter

Link: diesel.com/collections/fashion-show

Vintage Film Poster

Links:

The New York Times, 12feb2008, DVD Lubitsch Musicals: nytimes.com/2008/02/12/movies/ ... deo/12dvds.html
The Smiling Lieutenant (1931): imdb.com/title/tt0022074
Ernst Lubitsch, Director, (1892-1947): imdb.com/name/nm0523932
Leopold Jacobson, Writer Operetta "Ein Walzertraum", (1878-1943):http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0414885/
Felix Dorman, Writer Operetta "Ein Walzertraum", (1870-1928): imdb.com/name/nm0233791
Maurice Chevallier, Lt. Nikolaus 'Niki' von Preyn, (1888-1972): imdb.com/name/nm0002001
Claudette Colbert, Franzi, (1903-1996): imdb.com/name/nm0001055

El Logotipo de Hoy

Défilé Diesel P-A-P, Printemps-été, 2008, Prêt-à-porter
Défilé Diesel P-A-P, Printemps-été, 2008, Prêt-à-porter [fuente]
madame.lefigaro.fr/mode/defile ... es/7/293-diesel

Défilé Diesel P-A-P, Printemps-été, 2008, Prêt-à-porter
Défilé Diesel P-A-P, Printemps-été, 2008, Prêt-à-porter [fuente]
madame.lefigaro.fr/mode/defile ... es/7/293-diesel

Défilé Diesel P-A-P, Printemps-été, 2008, Prêt-à-porter
Défilé Diesel P-A-P, Printemps-été, 2008, Prêt-à-porter [fuente]
madame.lefigaro.fr/mode/defile ... es/7/293-diesel

Défilé Diesel P-A-P, Printemps-été, 2008, Prêt-à-porter
Défilé Diesel P-A-P, Printemps-été, 2008, Prêt-à-porter [fuente]
madame.lefigaro.fr/mode/defile ... es/7/293-diesel

Coplita

Desde que te vi venir
le dije a mi corazón:
¡qué bonita piedrecita
para dar un tropezón!

Fuente:
Jorge M. Furt
Cancionero Popular Rioplatense: Lírica Gauchesca Tomo II
Alicante : Biblioteca Virtual Miguel de Cervantes, 2003
Edición digital basada en la de Buenos Aires, Imprenta y Casa Editora "Coni", 1925.
cervantesvirtual.com/servlet/S ... 91/p0000006.htm
[1952 (Córdoba).]

Imágenes de Salida

National Gallery of Art, 4th and Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, D.C.

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec
French, 1864 - 1901
Maxime Dethomas, 1896
Chester Dale Collection
1963.10.219
Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec
French, 1864 - 1901
Maxime Dethomas, 1896
Chester Dale Collection
1963.10.219 [fuente]
nga.gov/cgi-bin/pimage?46411_0_0

Arte al Dia Internacional, 14 de Junio de 2007 Newsletter semanal artealdia.com
EL SITIO RECOMENDADO antoniaguzman.com.ar/index.htm

Antonia Guzmán
The Fair Place/El Sitio Justo
2008
40 x 55 inches
painting, acrylic on canvas
Antonia Guzmán
The Fair Place/El Sitio Justo
2008
40 x 55 inches
painting, acrylic on canvas

Links:
mountainshadowgallery.net/cont ... /view/28/46/1/1
naomisilvagallery.com/Antonia_ ... uzman/index.htm
Exposiciones Personales: Desde el 2 de Febrero en Mountain Shadow Gallery de Tucson, Arizona y, desde el 15 del mismo mes en Naomi Silva Gallery de Atlanta.

Christie's New York, 23 de Octubre de 2007 Christie's Prints & Multiples - October 30-31, New York

JOAN MIRO
La femme toupie (D. 652)
etching, aquatint and carborundum in colors, 1974, on Arches watermark Maeght, signed in pencil, numbered 'HC XVIII/XXIV' (the edition was 50), with full margins, minor surface soiling, a few pale scattered foxmarks, pale uneven mat staining (stronger in the left and right margins), occasional soft handling creases, otherwise in good condition, framed
P. 46½ x 29¼ in. (1181 x 743 mm.)
S. 54¾ x 38 in. (1391 x 965 mm.)
JOAN MIRO
La femme toupie (D. 652)
etching, aquatint and carborundum in colors, 1974, on Arches watermark Maeght, signed in pencil, numbered 'HC XVIII/XXIV' (the edition was 50), with full margins, minor surface soiling, a few pale scattered foxmarks, pale uneven mat staining (stronger in the left and right margins), occasional soft handling creases, otherwise in good condition, framed
P. 46½ x 29¼ in. (1181 x 743 mm.)
S. 54¾ x 38 in. (1391 x 965 mm.) [fuente]
christies.com/LotFinder/lot_de ... bjectID=4986590

Price Realized
$55,000
Estimate
$30,000 - $50,000
Sale Information
Sale 1897
Prints And Multiples
30 - 31 October 2007
New York, Rockefeller Plaza

Arte al Dia Internacional, 15 de Noviembre de 2007 Newsletter semanal artealdia.com
EL SITIO RECOMENDADO pablodimasso.com.ar

Pablo Di Masso
Rasguido
2006
21 x 30 cm
Pablo Di Masso
Rasguido
2006
21 x 30 cm
pablodimasso.com.ar

THE NEW YORK TIMES, 14 FEBRUARY 2008
Poussin and Nature: Arcadian Visions

[Photo: Musée du Louvre]
Nicolas Poussin (1594-1665): "Summer: Ruth and Boaz"
If a painter can be judged by the love he inspires, writes Holland Cotter, Nicolas Poussin (1594-1665) was one of art history’s favorite valentines. Corot, Delacroix, Constable and Cézanne all adored him. So did Picasso and Matisse. Nor were artists his only fans. The 19th-century English critic William Hazlitt surpassed himself in his praise of Poussin and may well have introduced his work to an already deeply Poussinian John Keats. And the romance continues.
Photo: Musée du Louvre
Nicolas Poussin (1594-1665): "Summer: Ruth and Boaz"
If a painter can be judged by the love he inspires, writes Holland Cotter, Nicolas Poussin (1594-1665) was one of art history’s favorite valentines. Corot, Delacroix, Constable and Cézanne all adored him. So did Picasso and Matisse. Nor were artists his only fans. The 19th-century English critic William Hazlitt surpassed himself in his praise of Poussin and may well have introduced his work to an already deeply Poussinian John Keats. And the romance continues. [fuente]
nytimes.com/slideshow/2008/02/ ... POUS_index.html

THE NEW YORK SUN 20 FEBRUARY 2008

[SOTHEBY’S]
SQUARED OFF The prices for work by Piet Mondrian — such as ‘Composition with Black, Red, Gray, Yellow and Blue,’ which Sotheby’s sold in London this month for $2.1 million — vary from sale to sale, but that doesn’t always reflect the mood of the art market.
SOTHEBY’S
SQUARED OFF The prices for work by Piet Mondrian — such as ‘Composition with Black, Red, Gray, Yellow and Blue,’ which Sotheby’s sold in London this month for $2.1 million — vary from sale to sale, but that doesn’t always reflect the mood of the art market. [fuente]

THE NEW YORK SUN 21 FEBRUARY 2008

[GULF + WESTERN GALLERY]
PUSHING BOUNDARIES The second of four exhibits showcasing the photography of graduating seniors enrolled at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts has its opening today. Thirteen student artists are featured in this installment, including Jacqueline Bovaird, whose works document her trips to India and Bhutan; Bonnie Briant, who embellishes her images with text, and Robert Sukrachand, who photographed Jackson Heights, Queens, exposing the juxtaposition of homelessness and addiction with the bustling life of 74th Street. Other highlights include an untitled work (2007), above, by Monique Jaques, from her collection “Transient Boundaries,” which reflects how deeply connected travel is to her photography. Opens today, through Saturday, March 15, Monday–Friday, 10 a.m.–7 p.m., Saturday, noon–5 p.m., NYU, Gulf + Western Gallery and the 8th Floor Gallery, 721 Broadway at Waverly Place, 212-998-1930, free.
GULF + WESTERN GALLERY
PUSHING BOUNDARIES The second of four exhibits showcasing the photography of graduating seniors enrolled at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts has its opening today. Thirteen student artists are featured in this installment, including Jacqueline Bovaird, whose works document her trips to India and Bhutan; Bonnie Briant, who embellishes her images with text, and Robert Sukrachand, who photographed Jackson Heights, Queens, exposing the juxtaposition of homelessness and addiction with the bustling life of 74th Street. Other highlights include an untitled work (2007), above, by Monique Jaques, from her collection “Transient Boundaries,” which reflects how deeply connected travel is to her photography. Opens today, through Saturday, March 15, Monday–Friday, 10 a.m.–7 p.m., Saturday, noon–5 p.m., NYU, Gulf + Western Gallery and the 8th Floor Gallery, 721 Broadway at Waverly Place, 212-998-1930, free. [fuente]

THE NEW YORK SUN 21 FEBRUARY 2008

[CHEI M & READ]
Juan Uslé, ‘Cada Vez Mas Cerca’ (2006–07).
CHEI M & READ
Juan Uslé, ‘Cada Vez Mas Cerca’ (2006–07). [fuente]

Uslé until March 15 (547 W. 25th St., between Tenth and Eleventh avenues, 212-242-7727).

THE NEW YORK SUN 25 FEBRUARY 2008
ARTS & LETTERS
Oui, an Oscar

[KEVORKDJANSEZIAN/AP]
BEST ACTRESS French actress Marion Cotillard, the winner of an Academy Award for her work in ‘La Vie en Rose,’ arrives for the 80th Academy Awards yesterday in Los Angeles.
KEVORKDJANSEZIAN/AP
BEST ACTRESS French actress Marion Cotillard, the winner of an Academy Award for her work in ‘La Vie en Rose,’ arrives for the 80th Academy Awards yesterday in Los Angeles. [fuente]

TheatreDance.comChau!, nos vemos en Geba !