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WICKED The Musical, Apollo Victoria Theatre, Wilton Road, London<br>The Company.<br>[Photograph by Tristram Kenton]
WICKED The Musical, Apollo Victoria Theatre, Wilton Road, London
The Company.
[Photograph by Tristram Kenton]

WICKED The Musical, Apollo Victoria Theatre, Wilton Road, London, SW1V 1LG
Prices: £60.00, £50.00, £40.00, £30.00, £25.00, £20.00, £15.00
wickedthemusical.co.uk/booktickets.php

Paul Taylor Dance Company (con Piazzolla) at City Center

The New York Times, March 4, 2008
Dance Review

From a Master Craftsman, Recurring Themes of Divinity, Death and Desire

[Richard Termine for The New York Times]
Lisa Viola, center top, and dancers from the Paul Taylor Dance Company in Mr. Taylor’s “Equinox,” set to Brahms’s first string quintet, at City Center.
Richard Termine for The New York Times
Lisa Viola, center top, and dancers from the Paul Taylor Dance Company in Mr. Taylor’s “Equinox,” set to Brahms’s first string quintet, at City Center. [fuente]
nytimes.com/2008/03/04/arts/dance/04equi.html

By ALASTAIR MACAULAY

“Life’s a curse, love’s a blight, God’s a blaggard, cherry blossom is quite nice.” With these words a character in Tom Stoppard’s play “The Invention of Love” sums up A. E. Housman’s book of verse “A Shropshire Lad.” A latter-day cynic could apply them to the dance works of Paul Taylor

For all of Mr. Taylor’s vastly greater range, Housman-like themes keep coming around in his repertory, as his current season at City Center demonstrates. What living choreographer more often shows or hints at death? Or more often brings in figures suggesting the religious or the divine? Where Housman employed the idea of rural simplicity, Mr. Taylor invokes primitive ceremony. The image of a glorious hero in the prime of life is as central to his work as to Housman’s, and frequently that hero is marked for death, just as fulfilled love is shown as something finite.

The Playbill essay on Mr. Taylor reminds us, proudly, of his avant-garde beginnings in the 1950s. Is there anything avant-garde left in Mr. Taylor today? He retains a disquietingly original mind, which isn’t the same thing. Instead he has long since become a master craftsman. This authority is evident both in the complex dynamics with which he fits his dances to music (who knows more about how to make slow work against fast, or sharp against smooth?) and in his elaborate, but generally symmetrical, display of spatial geometries.

Sunday afternoon’s triple bill of Mr. Taylor’s “Equinox,” “Fiends Angelical” and “Piazzolla Caldera” seemed to celebrate his variety. “Equinox” (1983), set to Brahms’s first string quintet, is a modern “Love’s Labour’s Lost” view of four pairs of elegant male-female lovers, clouded by a woman’s central solo (danced by Lisa Viola) in which her private misgivings or grief intimate that the rest is already a memory.

In “Fiends Angelical” (2000), to George Crumb’s “Black Angels” (with its quotation of Schubert’s “Death and the Maiden”), a priestess (Parisa Khobdeh) presides over a primitive tribe amid which twinlike lovers (Annmaria Mazzini and Michael Trusnovec) die and are brought back to life. “Piazzolla Caldera” (1997) distills the sexual desires and raunchy dramas of the tango, to music by Astor Piazzolla and Jerzy Peterburshsky.

For me, however, the diversity and craftsmanship of such a program exist mainly on the surface. The construction of “Piazzolla Caldera” (which always wins a warm ovation from the audience) is impressive. But neither do its actual dances grip me nor do its steamy dramas convince me for a moment.

Mr. Taylor lays emphasis at several points on one woman’s unfulfilled desires (Ms. Mazzini, legs signally parted much of the time, body writhing) and in one sequence on a male couple (Richard Chen See and Francisco Graciano) who are evidently plastered and whose physical togetherness is ambiguous. Though I can imagine enjoying these and other layers in another treatment, this piece’s account of them is heavy-handed.

“Fiends Angelical,” with its cult/love/death/religion story, is duller in the theater than it ought to be. But “Equinox,” which makes so much of the idyllic community and sweet love of its couples ought to be more bland than it proves. Here Mr. Taylor’s ingenuity as a dramatic poet rises, giving us multiple meanings and undercutting the dream with notes of pathos and paradox. His brilliance in contrasting a dance tempo with a musical one is at its most eloquent. Such subtleties, though, make the rest of the program feel the more crude.

Yet the span of Friday night’s program — “Aureole” (1962), “Troilus and Cressida (reduced)” (2006), “Counterswarm” (1988) and “Promethean Fire” (2002) — only grows with recollection. True, “Troilus” (to Ponchielli’s “Dance of the Hours,” the opera-ballet score that Disney made uproarious in “Fantasia” and to which Christopher Wheeldon restored its charm in 2006) is less funny than it tries to be. True, “Counterswarm,” to Ligeti, is a clever but unabsorbing conception of humans viewed as insects, and the real charm of “Aureole,” to Handel, is reduced by the women’s autopilot bright smiles (also by Mr. See’s exaggerated facial reactions). But all four of these pieces face in strikingly different directions.

“Aureole,” the oldest piece in this season’s repertory, is a true classic of Taylor style. You can feel its dance juice working richly through the whole body, and amid its several moods, the central male solo (originally performed by Mr. Taylor himself, now by Orion Duckstein) is a particular marvel of unbroken fluency.

“Promethean Fire” (to three Bach scores as orchestrated by Stokowski) includes images of love and death, and yet what’s more thrilling is Mr. Taylor’s kaleidoscopic sweep of successive group geometries. It has grandeur, urgency, touches of Busby Berkeley absurdity and “Metropolis” epic impersonality. How odd; how irresistible. We’re left thinking: who else but Mr. Taylor?

The company performs through March 16 at City Center, 131 West 55th Street, Manhattan; (212) 581-1212, citycenter.org.

nytimes.com/2008/03/04/arts/dance/04equi.html

Frenesí de Palmeras en La Máscara

El universo disparatado de Las Amaro

Frenesí de palmeras es un homenaje a Blanquita Amaro y a su entorno musical

Domingo 2 de marzo de 2008 | Publicado en la Edición impresa
Calificación LA NACION: ****

Un elenco con creatividad, talento y mucha gracia
Un elenco con creatividad, talento y mucha gracia [fuente]
lanacion.com.ar/entretenimient ... ?nota_id=992051

Frenesí de palmeras. Creación del grupo Las Amaro. Dirección teatral: Eduardo Bertoglio. Con Cristina Ghione, Juliana Corazzina, Bárbara Aguirre, Malena Sánchez Napal. Dirección musical: Cristina Ghione. En La Máscara (Piedras 736). Funciones: sábados, a las 21. Duración: 80 minutos.Creado en 2005, el grupo Las Amaro decidió homenajear a Blanquita Amaro y, también, a todo aquel mundo artístico caribeño que, en las décadas del 40 y 50, promovía una fuerte ola de creatividad a través de ritmos de lo más dispares.

Nuestra opinión: muy buena

En Frenesí de palmeras las cuatro intérpretes conforman una familia musical guiada por su madre (Rubí Amaro) que parecen ir de pueblo en pueblo con su arte, haciendo el número vivo en los cines o actuando en los más diversos espacios de variedades.

A través de la experiencia, el espectador tendrá la oportunidad no sólo de escucharlas cantar boleros, chachachás, pasodobles o rumbas, sino que también interpretarán spots radiales de la época, como el de los pilotos Aguamar o el de Odol. También habrá espacio para reconocer cómo es la relación de esa madre con sus hijas y hasta cómo se llevan las muchachas entre ellas. El mundo de Las Amaro es sumamente disparatado, sus historias personales están cargadas de grotesco; pero cuando salen a cantar, la cosa cambia, y mucho. Todo aquello que se ensombrece en el camarín, en la escena, se torna luz plena y brillante. Es que ahí demuestran que son muy buenas cantantes y hasta se animan a versiones más que atractivas de composiciones muy difundidas como "Frenesí", "Quizás, quizás, quizás", "Ansiedad" o "La chica del 17"; en esta última, sobre todo con un juego teatral muy destacado.

Desde la dirección, Eduardo Bertoglio impone una teatralidad muy pequeña, pero siempre segura. Puede decirse que, básicamente, el de Las Amaro es un mundo musical, pero a la hora de satirizar sus vidas en la ficción lo hacen con mucha gracia y provocando continuamente a la platea.

Las Amaro tienen creatividad, talento y mucha gracia. Y aunque el espectáculo se alargue unos minutos, vale la pena tenerlas en cuenta a la hora de compartir una experiencia de teatro y música.

Carlos Pacheco

lanacion.com.ar/entretenimient ... ?nota_id=992051

King Arthur at the New York State Theater

The New York Sun, 03 March 2008

Mark Morris’s Muse

Forget the text — the choreographer’s production of ‘King Arthur’ is steered by the score, Mary Staub writes.

[P E T E R DA S I LVA
M M D G]
GUIDED BY VOICES Soprano Mhairi Lawson and the Mark Morris Dance Group in ‘King Arthur.’
P E T E R DA S I LVA
M M D G

GUIDED BY VOICES Soprano Mhairi Lawson and the Mark Morris Dance Group in ‘King Arthur.’ [fuente]

[P E T E R D A S I L V A
M M D G]
DANCES AT A GATHERING Members of the Mark Morris Dance Group in a scene from ‘King Arthur.’
P E T E R D A S I L V A
M M D G

DANCES AT A GATHERING Members of the Mark Morris Dance Group in a scene from ‘King Arthur.’ [fuente]

[Heidi Schumann for The New York Times]
A scene from the Berkeley production of “King Arthur,” with Andrew Foster-Williams and Mhairi Lawson.
Heidi Schumann for The New York Times
A scene from the Berkeley production of “King Arthur,” with Andrew Foster-Williams and Mhairi Lawson. [fuente]
nytimes.com/2008/03/02/arts/dance/02rock.html

[Peter DaSilva]
Scene from the Berkeley production of “King Arthur.”
Peter DaSilva
Scene from the Berkeley production of “King Arthur.” [fuente]
nytimes.com/2008/03/02/arts/dance/02rock.html

Mary Staub

Mark Morris’s productions are known for being both meticulously musical and palpably frivolous, and it is these attributes that audiences and critics either love or hate. More so than most other choreographers’ works, Mr. Morris’s have brought forth a divided mass of fervent followers and challengers.

This was true of Mr. Morris’s production of Henry Purcell’s semi-opera “King Arthur” when it appeared in London and Berkeley in 2006, and it may well prove true when this same production has its New York premiere at the New York State Theater for New York City Opera on Wednesday. As in most of Mr. Morris’s other works, it was the music — rather than an idea or concept — that guided the scene and story of “King Arthur.”

“The music is clever, wonderful, exciting, exuberant,” Mr. Morris said last week. “It’s the kind of music that stays in your head and you keep on humming after you no longer hear it.”

When originally performed in 1691, “King Arthur” was a four-hour historical epic composed of music, dance, song, and spoken text in rhyming couplets by John Dryden. It has a comparatively scant performance history, perhaps due to its hybrid nature as a “semi-opera.” The plot centers on King Arthur’s struggle against Oswald and his invading Saxons — while valiantly rescuing his beloved Emmeline — and culminates in a joyous celebration of the British empire.

In Mr. Morris’s production, Dryden’s spoken text has been cut completely, the king has been reduced to a crown, and the overall show is neatly compressed into 110 minutes.

“The problem with the text is in the way it was written — it’s in rhymed couplets. It’s boring, and I got rid of it,” Mr. Morris said with typical bluntness. “It’s just so old that the play doesn’t make sense anymore,” he explained. “But the music is beautiful.”

As Dryden’s spoken text originally conveyed most of the saga’s narrative thread, and his sung lyrics bore only limited action, Mr. Morris had little explicit plot to work into his production, and could thus let musicality motivate all movement. What he came up with is a joyous celebration and near timeless burst of vivacity and love, with little resemblance to Purcell’s epic about heroism, nationalism, and chivalry.

Mr. Morris’s “King Arthur” takes place over five nearly selfcontained acts. During the course of the production, seven musical soloists intermingle with the Mark Morris Dance Group and together stage a whimsical vaudeville show. The singers dance a little, and the dancers sing a little, and the whole thing culminates in a grand finale with tumbling and juggling. “It’s about love, in every form — love of each other, love of your home, love of nature,” Mr. Morris said. “It’s very funny, very sexy. But it’s not maudlin in any way.”

Mr. Morris recalled hearing Purcell’s music as a child, and throughout the years has repeatedly turned to Baroque compositions for his choreography. He is also no stranger to operatic productions; Mr. Morris has directed Rameau’s “Platée,” Gluck’s “Orfeo ed Euridice,” and Purcell’s “Dido and Aeneas,” among others. And the choreographer’s musical proclivities have also led him to conduct; last month he conducted “Dido and Aeneas” while his company was on tour in Virginia. “It’s scary, but I hope to do more of it,” he said of conducting. Although Mr. Morris first played around with “King Arthur” almost a decade ago, instability at the English National Opera led him to abandon the project again and again. It was only upon his most recent and final attack on the material — when working with a wellknown entourage that included Adrianne Lobel for sets, James Ingalls for lighting, and Isaac Mizrahi for costume design — that he decided to totally drop Dryden’s text. For audiences who cling tightly to a discernible Arthur, Oswald, Emmeline, et al., this may well be unforgivable. But for those willing to be carried along by the joyous spirit of Mr. Morris’s inventions, it promises to please.
“It’s a celebration of theater, music, love,” Mr. Morris said. “What else could you want?”

Starting March 5, New York State Theater, Lincoln Center, 212-721-6500.

Links:

Link The New York Times, 03 March 2008: nytimes.com/2008/03/02/arts/dance/02rock.html

Ya he regresado de mis vacaciones (Nancy Braga)

lunes, 03 de marzo de 2008 11:26
aquí Nancy !!

Nancy Braga

Hola a todas/os, les quiero contar q ya he regresado de mis vacaciones, y estoy lista para volver a conectarme nuevamente, besossss

Nancy

Congreso Internacional de Tangoterapia en Rosario, Julio 2008 (Ricardo Schoua)

domingo, 02 de marzo de 2008 23:33
[Tango y Cultura Popular (TyCP)] Nro. 90

Ricardo Schoua

Congreso Internacional de Tangoterapia en Rosario, Julio 2008
Congreso Internacional de Tangoterapia en Rosario, Julio 2008
congresotangoterapia.com

Clases de Tango Borquez desde el 12 Marzo

sábado, 01 de marzo de 2008 12:26

Inés Araujo

Hola Augusto!!! te cuento que hablé con Carlos Borquez y me dijo que comienza las clases de Tango el miércoles 12 de marzo para todo el que quiera ir y divertirse aprendiendo a bailar.
cordialmente Inés

Inés Araujo, Carlos Borquez
Cena y Baile viernes 28diciembre2007, en Geba San Martín [Foto Cristina Rivera]
Inés Araujo, Carlos Borquez
Cena y Baile viernes 28diciembre2007, en Geba San Martín Foto Cristina Rivera

El Béisbol, el Batey y los Cocolos en San Pedro de Macorís

lunes, 03 de marzo de 2008 16:05
Esta semana en el Centro León

Centroleon. Org. Do

El Centro León en San Pedro de Macorís
Arte en proceso

San Pedro de Macorís: la vida, el arte y el deporte nacional

Creación artística e identidad
Fecha: Miércoles 05 de marzo
Lugar: Museo de Historia de San Pedro de Macorís
Hora: 6:00 p.m.

Nadal Walcott, uno de los primeros pintores dominicanos en hacer del béisbol, el batey y los cocolos protagonistas de su obra, nos acompañará en una exploración por su arte, su vida y su pueblo natal.

galeriaexodo.com/art_in_the_ga ... 06/cocolos.html

batey.
(De or. caribe).

1. m. En los ingenios y demás fincas de campo de las Antillas, lugar ocupado por las casas de vivienda, calderas, trapiche, barracones, almacenes, etc.

DICCIONARIO DE LA LENGUA ESPAÑOLA - Vigésima segunda edición, Real Academia Española
buscon.rae.es/draeI/SrvltConsu ... US=3&LEMA=batey

cocolos
...
Uno de los grupos étnicos inmigrantes es el de los cocolos, provenientes de las Antillas Mayores y las Bahamas. La cultura (o subcultura) cocola es la reinterpretación de elementos culturales ingleses unidos a elementos culturales africanos por los esclavos y sus descendientes en las islas caribeñas de habla inglesa.
...

jmarcano.com/mipais/cultura/cocolo.html

Día de la Mujer en el Consejo Profesional de Ciencias Económicas ( Susana Santorsola)

viernes, 29 de febrero de 2008 09:24
Actividades culturales semana 3 de marzo

Comisión de Cultura

Buenos días Sr. Augusto Lapeyre:
De acuerdo con lo conversado con la Dra. Susana Santorsola, le detallo para su difusión, las actividades que se realizarán en el Consejo Profesional de Ciencias Económicas de la Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires en la semana del 3 de marzo:
Sobre la temática "Mujer", se presentarán los siguientes espectáculos:

Martes 4 de marzo – 19:00 hs.
Cine-Debate Coord. Dr. C.P. Luis Cortés:
Princesas
Con Candela Peña, Pere Arquillué, Micaela Nevárez
Dirigida por Fernando León de Aranoa

Viernes 7 de marzo - 19:00 hs.
Homenaje en el Día Internacional de la Mujer
Entrega de distinciones a mujeres destacadas por su labor: María de los Angeles Kalbermatter (campo social), Martha Noguera (pianista), Ester Polak de Fried (Médica, Especialista en Endocrinología, Ginecología y Reproducción Humana).
Recordando a las mujeres en su día, el Consejo brindará el espectáculo: " Recital de Canciones argentinas y de comedias musicales", con la participación especial del barítono Lucas Debevec-Mayer y el maestro Diego Licciardi al piano. Coordinación: Dra. C.P. Marisa M. M. Matta
Locución: Dr. C.P. Ricardo A. Nieto

Desde ya, muchas gracias.

Atte.

Sandra G. Mattesco
Cultura

Insane in the Brain by Bounce at the Peacock, London

Dance

Bounce

**** Peacock, London

Sanjoy Roy
Friday February 29, 2008
The Guardian

[Photograph: Tristram Kenton]
Skewed pose ... Bounce.
Photograph: Tristram Kenton
Skewed pose ... Bounce. [fuente]
arts.guardian.co.uk/theatre/da ... 2260996,00.html

It's a bit bonkers and a bit brilliant - and, given that it's a hip-hop dance theatre take on One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, what more could you want? Insane in the Brain, by the Swedish company Bounce, makes Ken Kesey's classic counterculture story of power and madness in a mental institution seem designed for a hip-hop makeover. True, hip-hop's skewed poses, crazy angles and zombie walks lend themselves to the subject; but Bounce transform the style into real theatre.

The characters are portrayed physically: stammering Billy (David Dalmo) is a mass of tics; geeky Dale (Alvaro Aguilera) is obsessively self-controlled. Mrs Taber (Ambra Succi) is a bipolar mover, her body tugging her in opposite directions. Ideas are also neatly given physical form. Fearsome Nurse Ratched (Teneisha Bonner, a tiny powerhouse of megalomania) puts her patients through a daily ballet routine, a visceral encapsulation of the suppression of individuality and the imposition of external discipline. It is contrasted with a kind of free-form, experimental hip-hop that revels in expression and play.

That makes the production sound serious; actually, it's a riot. The story zips between high drama, knockabout comedy and heartwarming sentiment. There is an unexpected film interlude - think Buster Keaton meets krumping on MTV - and the liberation of the inmates' spirits is figured, hilariously, through stoned dub, trippy bhangra and, finally, some frenetic aerobics straight out of Flashdance.

Most impressive is the show's freewheeling way with genre: hip-hop may be the basis, but it's not a constraint. So the choreography never resorts to straightforward display, and the music careens between rap, jazz-funk, metal, Grieg and tango, but is always apt. Combine this with unpretentious performances, atmospheric lighting and versatile sets, and you've got a popular hit.

Until March 16. Box office: 0844 412 4300.

arts.guardian.co.uk/theatre/da ... 2260996,00.html

Links:

sadlerswells.com/show/Bounce-08.htm

[Photograph: Tristram Kenton]
Skewed pose ... Bounce. Bounce Bounce Bounce

Paul Taylor Dance Company

The New York Sun, 29 February 2008, Ad

Paul Taylor Dance Company
Paul Taylor Dance Company

State Ballet of Georgia

The New York Sun, 29 February 2008

Shining Through A Star’s Wake

[J A C K V A R T O O G I A N]
ABOVE THE REST The State Ballet of Georgia with Nina Ananiashvili, center, in ‘Bizet Variations.’
J A C K V A R T O O G I A N
ABOVE THE REST The State Ballet of Georgia with Nina Ananiashvili, center, in ‘Bizet Variations.’ [fuente]

By JOEL LOBENTHAL

The State Ballet of Georgia is a good company, but it can be a lot better still. Its Brooklyn Academy of Music stint, which began on Wednesday night, is the last leg of a national tour, the company’s second over the past year. Since 2004, the company has been led by Georgian ballerina Nina Ananiashvili, who starred with the Bolshoi during the 1980s and 1990s and is currently a ballerina at American Ballet Theatre. Ms. Ananiashvili’s fame is giving the company exposure it might not otherwise have, but the company can stand on its own merits.

...

Until March 2 (30 Lafayette Ave., Brooklyn, 718-636-4100).

daily.nysun.com/Daily/Skins/NY ... n/navigator.asp Page 137

Links:

The New York Times, 03 March 2008: nytimes.com/2008/03/03/arts/dance/03fest.html

[Julieta Cervantes for The New York Times]
Nina Ananiashvili in “Dreams About Japan” in Brooklyn.
Julieta Cervantes for The New York Times
Nina Ananiashvili in “Dreams About Japan” in Brooklyn. [fuente]
nytimes.com/2008/03/03/arts/dance/03fest.html

"Passing Strange", a rock concert with a story to tell, at the Belasco Theater, Broadway

The New York Times, February 29, 2008
THEATER REVIEW | 'PASSING STRANGE'

It’s a Hard Rock Life

By CHARLES ISHERWOOD

[Sara Krulwich/The New York Times]
The singer-songwriter Stew, center, with Colman Domingo, rear left, and Daniel Breaker, right, in "Passing Strange" at the Belasco Theater.
Sara Krulwich/The New York Times
The singer-songwriter Stew, center, with Colman Domingo, rear left, and Daniel Breaker, right, in "Passing Strange" at the Belasco Theater. [fuente]
nytimes.com/imagepages/2008/02 ... ange.ready.html

“At this point in the play, we were planning a show tune,” says the roly-poly guy with the guitar and the funny eyeglasses. “An upbeat gotta-leave-this-town kinda show tune.”

It appears there’s a little problem. “We don’t know how to write those kind of tunes,” he adds, in a tone of shrugging apology.

This may seem a bit strange, since the roly-poly guy with the guitar and the funny eyeglasses happens to be standing on the stage of the Belasco Theater, where the exuberant new show “Passing Strange” opened on Thursday night.

But “Passing Strange” just ain’t a show tune kinda show, despite its arrival at a venerable Broadway theater where many a gotta-leave-this-town anthem has surely been sung. Although it is far richer in wit, feeling and sheer personality than most of what is classified as musical theater in the neighborhood around Times Square these days, its big heart throbs to the sound of electric guitars, searing synthesizer chords, driving drums and lyrics delivered not in a clean croon but a throaty yelp.

A rock ’n’ roll autobiography of an artist in search of himself, “Passing Strange” is bursting at the seams with melodic songs, and it features a handful of theatrical performances to treasure. It is undeniably playing on Broadway, after transferring from a summer run at the Public Theater downtown.

But please don’t call it a Broadway musical. You could scare away too many people who might actually enjoy it.

Call it a rock concert with a story to tell, trimmed with a lot of great jokes. Or call it a sprawling work of performance art, complete with angry rants and scary drag queens. Call it whatever you want, really. I’ll just call it wonderful, and a welcome anomaly on Broadway, which can use all the vigorous new artistic blood it can get.

The roly-poly guy is a singer-songwriter with a cult following who goes by the single name of Stew. He is the author of the show’s book and lyrics, the composer (with Heidi Rodewald) of its music, and its lead guitarist and musical narrator too.

...

theater2.nytimes.com/2008/02/2 ... ews/29stra.html

Links:

The New York Sun, 29 Feb 2008: daily.nysun.com/Daily/Skins/NY ... n/navigator.asp Page 13

The New York Times, 04 March 2008 nytimes.com/pages/arts/index.html

Multimedia
Video: UrbanEye

Melena Ryzik surveys the full range of New York’s cultural offerings. This week: The new musical “Passing Strange” opens at the Belasco Theater.
Duración: 03:19

Ballet de Monterrey at the Joyce Theater

The New York Times, February 28, 2008
Dance Review

Robust Moves, Exuberant Yet Distinguished

[Ruby Washington/The New York Times]
Members of Ballet de Monterrey performing Yanis Pikieris’s “Danzón” at the Joyce Theater.
Ruby Washington/The New York Times
Members of Ballet de Monterrey performing Yanis Pikieris’s “Danzón” at the Joyce Theater. [fuente]
nytimes.com/2008/02/28/arts/dance/28joyc.html

By GIA KOURLAS

Ballet de Monterrey traveled many miles from its home in northeastern Mexico to land at the Joyce Theater on Tuesday night. For the occasion the company laid out quite a spread: eight short dances featuring pageboy wigs, broken hearts, tango encounters, a stage that resembled a scene out of the 1982 film “Tron,” spooky masks, a Day of the Dead celebration and star-crossed lovers. But what really stood out in every work, no matter the tone, was exuberant dancing, occasionally blurred by exhaustion yet distinguished by willful, effervescent classicism.

Clearly Ballet de Monterrey, formed in 1990, takes its classical roots seriously. Its artistic directors over the last 18 years have included Fernando Alonso, Fernando Bujones and Robert Hill, formerly a principal dancer with American Ballet Theater. Last year Luis Serrano, a Cuban dancer and former member of Miami City Ballet, took the post.

Mr. Serrano choreographs too, and this Joyce engagement includes two of his works. “Perfidia,” a duet from 2002, displays much of Katia Carranza’s exquisite airiness; she possesses a delicate aura that gives her strong technique a sweet sincerity. And in “Huapango,” a premiere to music by Pablo Moncayo, eight dancers leap and twist above the stage with flickering, frenzied resolve. The piece is only eight minutes long but intense and jampacked with elaborate lifts; the dancers move so quickly that it seems the stage is coated with burning sand.

At times “Huapango” proves itself to be too frisky — relentlessly so — but two other new works choreographed by Yanis Pikieris, another alumnus of Miami City Ballet, display the dancers with greater texture: “Danzón,” inspired by the revered Mexican composer Arturo Márquez’s “Danzón No. 2,” and “Volver,” based on the Mexican Day of the Dead.

In spirit they are vastly different. “Volver” showcases a couple, Claudia Bandín and Yosek Prieto, who reunite in a romantic, haunting climax. “Danzón,” for seven couples, is something else entirely. Mr. Pikieris’s robust dance displays daring, piquant partnering, which sends the women soaring through the air like lambent jewels. But they make up only half of the picture in Ballet de Monterrey; for all their power and exertion, the men glitter too. To have both in ballet is a real gift.

Ballet de Monterrey continues through Sunday at the Joyce Theater, 175 Eighth Avenue, at 19th Street, Chelsea; (212) 242-0800 or joyce.org.

nytimes.com/2008/02/28/arts/dance/28joyc.html

El Musical "Bollywood The show" en Barcelona

El periódico.com 28/2/2008

EL DESEMBARCO DE UN 'SHOW' DE UNA CULTURA EXÓTICA

Bollywood despliega todo su color en Barcelona con un gran musical

El montaje, en el que intervienen 50 bailarines y actores, estará en el Tívoli hasta el 23 de marzo

La macroproducción india ha sido vista por más de medio millón de espectadores en el mundo

[Foto: JOAN CORTADELLAS]
Un momento del electrizante espectáculo Bollywood. The show que anoche se estrenó en el Tívoli.
Foto: JOAN CORTADELLAS
Un momento del electrizante espectáculo Bollywood. The show que anoche se estrenó en el Tívoli. [fuente]
elperiodico.com/default.asp?id ... ticia_PK=487108

BOLLYWOOD
THE SHOW
BOLLYWOOD
THE SHOW

NÚRIA MARTORELL, BARCELONA

Toda la vistosidad y alegría de Bollywood. Sus coloristas vestuarios y sus contagiosos ritmos. Sus coreografías más tradicionales y las más hip-hoperas. Y el ostentoso mundo de su activa cinematografía, concentrados en dos horas (intermedio incluido) y con un guión a modo de hilo argumental inspirado en una historia real. Así es el musical Bollywood. The show que ayer desembarcó en Barcelona --su única escala en España-- y que entusiasmó al público que anoche abarrotó el Teatre Tívoli.

El montaje, que cuenta con 50 bailarines y actores, aunque la música no es en directo, celebrará su función número 400 en este céntrico escenario de la calle de Casp donde permanecerá hasta el 23 de marzo. La bollywoodmania cuenta con un nuevo epicentro en Barcelona.

UNA JOVEN REBELDE

La historia comienza en el templo de Shiva. La dinastía familiar Merchant --encarnada por Shantilal (el abuelo) y Ayesha (su nieta)-- se siente con la responsabilidad de mantener vivas las viejas prácticas de la danza Kathak (la de los dioses). Pero mientras el veterano coreógrafo establece su propia escuela de danzas tradicionales folclóricas, la inquieta joven, defensora de los estilos más modernos occidentales, acaba rebelándose y marchándose a la capital, para convertirse en una auténtica reina de las coreografías de las películas de su país.

Finalmente, Ayesha vuelve a Rajastán para hacer las paces con su abuelo y, de paso, se reencuentra con el amor de su infancia: Uday (el transfondo de relato romántico, tan made in Bollywood, no podía faltar en la versión teatral). Pero cuando la chica regresa, se encuentra con que Shantilal agoniza, de modo que decide continuar ella con la tradición familiar. Las heridas de antaño se curan, y el eterno y universal conflicto intergeneracional se resuelve, para júbilo de todos.
Dos pantallas con subtítulos en castellano ayudan a seguir los diálogos de la representación y ubicar las escenas. Y los roles protagonistas son defendidos con autoridad por Chander Khanna, estrella de cine que ha participado en más de 60 anuncios, Carol Furtado, ganadora de concursos de belleza que figuró en el videoclip Bari Bari de Baba Sehgal, pionero de la música rap en la India, y Deepak Rawat, que le ficharon en la compañía a través de un casting y que ha enseñado jazz y hip- hop en Los Ángeles.

El show rescata atinadamente las imágenes, las coreografías y las bandas sonoras más famosas de esta creciente factoría, con enérgicas canciones que no tienen desperdicio como Dola re dola re, Dholi taro y Nimbooda. El montaje aprovecha para repasar, con sentido del humor, la historia de la meca del cine asiático.

Para tener una idea de lo que supone esta industria en la India, cabe indicar que se estrenan más de 20 películas al día, que son vistas a diario por más de cinco millones de espectadores, que acuden a las más de 13.000 salas de cine diseminadas por el país. Ir a ver una película es sinónimo de fiesta total. El público baila, aplaude y grita durante la sesión. Se llevan comida --muchas películas duran cuatro horas--, se ríen con los líos amorosos --pero que nadie espere ver ninguna escena de sexo explícito-- y jalean sin pudor a los actores. Y todo, sin que el vecino de butaca recrimine el alboroto.

La base del argumento de Bollywood. The show gira en torno a la reconocida coreógrafa Vaibhavi Merchant (quien cosechó un gran éxito de taquilla con el largometraje Fanaa), responsable de los bailes más impactantes de este electrizante espectáculo. Y la música ha sido compuesta y arreglada por los hermanos Salim y Sulaiman Merchant, integrantes de la emergente generación de creadores de Bollywood, y autores del éxito musical del filme Dhoom (con Shahrukh Khan en el cartel, todo un sex symbol nacional), entre otros títulos destacados.

Más de medio millón de espectadores en todo el mundo avalan esta macroproducción que se estrenó en Sydney (Australia) en el 2005 y que reivindica que Bollywood ha dejado de ser patrimonio de unos pocos interesados en la cultura india.

EL FALLIDO MALDÀ Dado el escaso éxito que tuvo la conversión del cine Maldà en una sala de Bollywood, y el hecho de que en la calle de Sant Pau muchos videoclubs especializados en el género hayan desaparecido (las descargas por internet hacen estragos), esta nueva fiebre por Bollywood fue celebrada con júbilo por los muchos amantes y practicantes de estos animados bailes. La profesora nativa Sheri Ahmed --directora del Club Massala y de su propia compañía de baile-- fue una de las que más disfrutó con este viaje iniciático de la intrépida Ayesha y su historia de amor con el fortachón Uday.

elperiodico.com/default.asp?id ... ticia_PK=487108

Links:

Bollywoodshow: bollywoodshow.de
Teatre Tivoli: grupbalana.com/obras/obrindex. ... 718162933&rec=1

Swing en Buenos Aires, Sábado 8 de Marzo, 22.00 (Enrique Varela)

miércoles, 27 de febrero de 2008 08:31
Novedades Happy Feet /// Fiesta de swing el 8 de marzo presentando al Hot Club de Boedo!

Enrique Varela

INFORMACION PARA DANCERS.......

----- Original Message -----
From: Happy Feet
To: Happy Feet
Sent: Tuesday, February 26, 2008 10:49 PM
Subject: Novedades Happy Feet /// Fiesta de swing el 8 de marzo presentando al Hot Club de Boedo!

HAPPY FEET
Buenos Aires
HAPPY FEET
Buenos Aires [fuente]
happy-feet.com.ar

MARZO 2008 /// swing en buenos aires
///FIESTA HAPPY FEET///
///SÁBADO 8 DE MARZO - 22 HS - SARMIENTO 1272///
PRIMER FIESTA HAPPY FEET DEL AÑO, PARA BAILAR LINDY HOP SIN PARAR EN UNA NOCHE A PURO SWING!

presentando al...
*HOT CLUB DE BOEDO*
EN GRAN HOMENAJE AL MAESTRO OSCAR ALEMAN
+
CELEBRAMOS EL DÍA DE LA MUJER /// con
*THE LUCHENA SISTERS* en una presentación especial
+
*dj invitado /// GABRIEL CAVALLINI*

"CULTURAL BUEN AYRE", SARMIENTO 1272, CAPITAL FEDERAL.
El horario de comienzo de la fiesta es a las 22 hs. y finaliza a las 5:00 hs.
La orquesta comezará a tocar a las 22:30 hs. puntual y se puede cenar en el salón.

El valor de la entrada es de $20.

¡Los esperamos!

Happy Feet
Keep on swingin'!
happy-feet.com.ar

¿Qué es el swing?
El swing (o lindy hop) es un estilo de baile de origen afroamericano nacido en los años '20 en Harlem, Nueva York, que se bailaba al ritmo de las big bands de la época en los salones de baile. Tuvo su auge entre finales de los años '20 y principio de los años '40. Luego de ese período su popularidad disminuyó hasta que en los años '80 un grupo de jóvenes entusiastas del jazz y del baile inició una etapa de renacimiento del swing que se desarrolla desde entonces alrededor del mundo.
En Buenos Aires hay alrededor de 200 bailarines de swing que, inspirados en el jazz, en la contagiosa energia del baile y el estilo de la época, dan vida a una movida increíble que crece cada día más.
Videos!
youtube.com/watch?v=SHcBYGN-3uM
youtube.com/watch?v=uUwZr9dIGqo
youtube.com/watch?v=kKPw9_BZgSE
youtube.com/watch?v=_G7MpPL-U64
Hot Club de Boedo!
hotclubdeboedo.blogspot.com

Cómo andan los bailadores de Geba???? (Claudia Tarazona)

martes, 26 de febrero de 2008 08:19
Newsletter Aerolatino-Geba exclusiva para suscriptores, mié 20 febrero 2008

Claudia Tarazona

Hola Augus!!!
còmo andan los bailadores de GEBA????
aquì muy buen tiempo a todo sol durante casi 8 dìas seguidos. Hoy un diluvioooooO!!
besos para todos.

Bette Midler, "The Showgirl Must Go On", Las Vegas

Los Angeles Times February 26, 2008
POP MUSIC REVIEW

Live: Better Midler

By Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer

LAS VEGAS -- Bette Midler is brash, funny, schmaltzy, surprising, poignant, charming, provocative, witty, bawdy and, of course, divine. She knows where Hollywood keeps its skeletons, and she's not afraid to throw open closet doors and drag out what she finds within. She's an absolute master of the stinging put-down, she can belt a big brassy ballad second to none, do a bit of hoofing and is an Academy Award nominee to boot.

...

latimes.com/entertainment/news ... 1,2246910.story

Links:

The New York Times, 03 March 2008: nytimes.com/2008/03/03/theater ... ews/03bett.html

[Laura Rauch for The New York Times]
Bette Midler, center, with two Harlettes, going on in her new show at the Colosseum at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas.
Laura Rauch for The New York Times
Bette Midler, center, with two Harlettes, going on in her new show at the Colosseum at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas. [fuente]
latimes.com/entertainment/news ... 1,2246910.story

[Photo: Paul Hawthorne/Getty Images]
To enhance her romp ’n’ roll, Ms. Midler will have plenty of visual props on hand, along with a 13-piece band, 20 female dancers, 4 backup singers, and 5 changes of costume. The show is scheduled to run for two years.
Photo: Paul Hawthorne/Getty Images
To enhance her romp ’n’ roll, Ms. Midler will have plenty of visual props on hand, along with a 13-piece band, 20 female dancers, 4 backup singers, and 5 changes of costume. The show is scheduled to run for two years. [fuente]
nytimes.com/2008/03/03/theater ... ews/03bett.html

Adding Machine at the Minetta Lane Theater (Off-Broadway)

bounce-ur@ms3.lga2.nytimes.com
Martes, 26 de Febrero de 2008 09:03 a.m.UrbanEye

Multimedia Features

Sum Songs
Photos (7) from the musical "Adding Machine."
Sum Songs
Photos (7) from the musical "Adding Machine."

nytimes.com/slideshow/2008/02/ ... SHOW_index.html

[Photo: Sara Krulwich/The New York Times]
“Adding Machine,” a musical adaptation of Elmer Rice’s 1923 play, opened Monday at the Minetta Lane Theater. The score is by Joshua Schmidt and the libretto by Mr. Schmidt and Jason Loewith.The show was developed and received its world premiere at the Next Theater Company of Evanston, Ill.
Photo: Sara Krulwich/The New York Times
“Adding Machine,” a musical adaptation of Elmer Rice’s 1923 play, opened Monday at the Minetta Lane Theater. The score is by Joshua Schmidt and the libretto by Mr. Schmidt and Jason Loewith.The show was developed and received its world premiere at the Next Theater Company of Evanston, Ill. [fuente]
nytimes.com/slideshow/2008/02/ ... SHOW_index.html

Rebecca Kelly Ballet

martes, 26 de febrero de 2008 04:23
Early Bird Special for RKB performances

Rebecca Kelly Ballet

APRIL 24 TO 26 THREE PREMIERS

Tear of the Clouds

Rebecca Kelly Ballet
Rebecca Kelly Ballet [fuente]
rebeccakellyballet.com

[Photo: Todd Bissonette]
Tear of the Clouds
Photo: Todd Bissonette
Tear of the Clouds
rebeccakellyballet.com/Pages/2008 Season.html

April 24 (7:30pm), 25 (8pm), and 26 (8pm), Rebecca Kelly Ballet will premier three works in its New York City Spring performance season at the Gerald Lynch Theatre at John Jay College on 899 10th Avenue.

Writing in Water, five women and the ephemera of dance, set to one of Beethoven’s last works, the Grosse Fugue.

Adirondack Elemental: 3 duets Air, Earth, Waters, with scores by Martha Gallagher, Abby Newton, and Sue Grimm.

Long Time Passing, a searing reflection inspired by letters from a Bronze Star Lieutenant stationed in Tikrit and Baghdad during Operation Iraqi Freedom, 2006-2007.

Tear of the Clouds (1989), the first of Rebecca Kelly’s environmentally themed ballets. Danced to the Dies Irae by Mozart, the howling of wolves, and Native American flute, the piece is viewed with projected images that create an animist world where dancers embody the spirit of the forest.

Box Office:
To purchase tickets in advance call Ticket Central: 212-279-4200,
or at 416 W 42nd Street, 12-8pm
Order on line: www.ticketcentral.com.
Full price $40, Student, senior, TDF and Dance Pass discounts apply.
For School and Group sales, 212-431-8489.
Rebecca Kelly Ballet New York Season

Rebecca Kelly Ballet brings a humanistic perspective to the stage through topical, emotional dances, fusing classical and modern techniques. In performance and through its outreach and education programs, RKB provokes imagination, inspires dialogue, and brings dance everywhere.

Astaire & Rogers, 1: Flying Down to Rio (1933)

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Flying Down to Rio: imdb.com/title/tt0024025

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Directed by Thornton Freeland
USA 1933

Fred and Ginger teamed for the first time as featured artists in the big production number, 'The Carioca': 'I'd like to try this thing just once' says Fred, launching the movies' greatest partnership. Otherwise notable mainly for the non-stop opticals which turn the film into a series of animated postcards. The nominal star, the wooden Raymond, is swept off his feet by the exotic Del Rio (one of those actresses who age only ten years in forty-odd), of whom a Yankee girl cries, 'What have these South Americans got below the equator that we haven't?'. The Berkeleyesque aerial ballet is a gas.

Posters

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Theatrical Release: December 22nd, 1933

DVD Menus

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Subtitle Sample

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Screen Captures

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dvdbeaver.com/film2/DVDReviews ... down_to_rio.htm

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cache.eb.com/eb/image?id=90591&rendTypeId=4

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movieposter.com/posters/archiv ... in/20/b70-10001

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nancita.blogspot.com/2005/10/g ... m-is-sorta.html

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classicmoviemusicals.com/rio7a.jpg

Défilé Just Cavalli, P-A-P, Automne-Hiver, 2008-2009, Prêt-à-porter

Défilé Just Cavalli, P-A-P, Automne-Hiver, 2008-2009, Prêt-à-porter

madame.lefigaro.fr/mode/defile ... alli/collection

Défilé Just Cavalli, P-A-P, Automne-Hiver, 2008-2009, Prêt-à-porter

Link: robertocavalli.it

imagen

Vintage Film Poster

Links:

The New York Times, 12feb2008, DVD Lubitsch Musicals: nytimes.com/2008/02/12/movies/ ... deo/12dvds.html
One Hour with You (1932): imdb.com/title/tt0023303
George Cukor, Director, (1899-1983): imdb.com/name/nm0002030
Ernst Lubitsch, Director, (1892-1947): imdb.com/name/nm0523932
Samson Raphaelson, Writer, (1894-1983): imdb.com/name/nm0710723
Lothar Schmidt, Play, (?):http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0773083/
Maurice Chevallier, Dr. Andre Bertier, (1888-1972): imdb.com/name/nm0002001
Jeanette MacDonald, Colette Bertier, (1903-1965): imdb.com/name/nm0531776
Genevieve Tobin, Mitzi Olivier (1899-1995): imdb.com/name/nm0864931

El Logotipo de Hoy

WICKED The Musical, Apollo Victoria Theatre, Wilton Road, London, SW1V 1LG
The Company. [Photograph by Tristram Kento]
WICKED The Musical, Apollo Victoria Theatre, Wilton Road, London, SW1V 1LG
The Company. Photograph by Tristram Kento
wickedthemusical.co.uk/sightssounds.php

Coplita

Bien haiga la piedra lisa
que en ella me refalé,
dame la mano mi vida
que yo me levantaré.

Fuente:
Jorge M. Furt
Cancionero Popular Rioplatense: Lírica Gauchesca Tomo II
Alicante : Biblioteca Virtual Miguel de Cervantes, 2003
Edición digital basada en la de Buenos Aires, Imprenta y Casa Editora "Coni", 1925.
cervantesvirtual.com/servlet/S ... 91/p0000006.htm
[1953 (Santiago del Estero).]

Imágenes de Salida

National Gallery of Art, 4th and Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, D.C.

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec
French, 1864 - 1901
Quadrille at the Moulin Rouge, 1892
oil on cardboard, 80.1 x 60.5 cm (31 1/2 x 23 3/4 in.)
Chester Dale Collection
1963.10.221
Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec
French, 1864 - 1901
Quadrille at the Moulin Rouge, 1892
oil on cardboard, 80.1 x 60.5 cm (31 1/2 x 23 3/4 in.)
Chester Dale Collection
1963.10.221 [fuente]
nga.gov/cgi-bin/pinfo?Object=46413+0+none

Christie's New York, 23 de Octubre de 2007 Christie's Prints & Multiples - October 30-31, New York

JOAN MIRO
L'Adorateur de soleil (D. 483)
etching, aquatint, and carborundum in colors, 1969, on Arches, signed in pencil, annotated 'H.C.' (the edition was 75), the full sheet, the purple attenuated, minor surface soiling, occasional soft handling creases, otherwise in good condition, framed
S. 41¾ x 26¾ in. (1061 x 680 mm.)
JOAN MIRO
L'Adorateur de soleil (D. 483)
etching, aquatint, and carborundum in colors, 1969, on Arches, signed in pencil, annotated 'H.C.' (the edition was 75), the full sheet, the purple attenuated, minor surface soiling, occasional soft handling creases, otherwise in good condition, framed
S. 41¾ x 26¾ in. (1061 x 680 mm.) [fuente]
christies.com/LotFinder/lot_de ... bjectID=4986573

Price Realized
$27,400
Estimate
$20,000 - $30,000
Sale Information
Sale 1897
Prints And Multiples
30 - 31 October 2007
New York, Rockefeller Plaza

Arte al Dia Internacional, 15 de Noviembre de 2007 Newsletter semanal artealdia.com
EL SITIO RECOMENDADO pablodimasso.com.ar

Pablo Di Masso
Gato Rojo
2006
21 x 30 cm
Pablo Di Masso
Gato Rojo
2006
21 x 30 cm
pablodimasso.com.ar

THE WALL STREET JOURNAL, 12 FEBRUARY 2008
Pepper … and Salt
February 12, 2008; Page A16

Pepper … and Salt
Pepper … and Salt [fuente]

THE NEW YORK TIMES, 14 FEBRUARY 2008
Poussin and Nature: Arcadian Visions

[Photo: The Metropolitan Museum of Art]
Nicolas Poussin (1594-1665): "Landscape with a River God"
/ The wall labels in “Poussin and Nature: Arcadian Visions” at the Metropolitan Museum, one of the first major Poussin shows since the 1994 Paris Grand Palais survey and the first ever to focus on landscapes, read like mash notes, with paintings and drawings referred to, one after another, as “astonishing,” “enchanting,” “splendid,” “marvelously beautiful,” “sublime.”
Photo: The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Nicolas Poussin (1594-1665): "Landscape with a River God"
/ The wall labels in “Poussin and Nature: Arcadian Visions” at the Metropolitan Museum, one of the first major Poussin shows since the 1994 Paris Grand Palais survey and the first ever to focus on landscapes, read like mash notes, with paintings and drawings referred to, one after another, as “astonishing,” “enchanting,” “splendid,” “marvelously beautiful,” “sublime.” [fuente]
nytimes.com/slideshow/2008/02/ ... 215-POUS_2.html

THE NEW YORK SUN 28 FEBRUARY 2008

[M E T R O P O L I TA N M U S E U M O F A RT]
Gustave Courbet, ‘Young Ladies on the Banks of the Seine’ (1856–57).
M E T R O P O L I TA N M U S E U M O F A RT
Gustave Courbet, ‘Young Ladies on the Banks of the Seine’ (1856–57). [fuente]

THE NEW YORK SUN 04 MARCH 2008

[C H R I ST I E’ S I M A G ES
C O R B I S]
A detail of Andre Derain’s ‘Boats in the Harbor, Collioure’ (1905).
C H R I ST I E’ S I M A G ES
C O R B I S

A detail of Andre Derain’s ‘Boats in the Harbor, Collioure’ (1905). [fuente]

TheatreDance.comChau!, nos vemos en Geba !