"Newsletter" Aerolatino-Geba
(Aerolatino y todas las Danzas que se practican en Geba)
exclusiva para suscriptores, mié 02 abril 2008
Reciben esta Newsletter 452 suscriptores

GONE WITH THE WIND<br>A LANDMARK NEW MUSICAL<br>Opens 4 April 2008 - New London Theatre, Drury Lane.
GONE WITH THE WIND
A LANDMARK NEW MUSICAL
Opens 4 April 2008 - New London Theatre, Drury Lane.

Show Fotográfico Domingo 06 Abril Sede San Martín (Cristina Rivera)

martes, 01 de abril de 2008 08:48
¿ Algún mensaje ?

Cristina Rivera

Agus, lo hacemos el domingo próximo
Beso
Cris....

Fecha: domingo 06/04 15.30hs.
Lugar: sede San Martín (y en vinculación con Clase Aerolatino Charly Calatrava)
Modelos: suscriptores de la Newsletter
Objetivo: divertirnos y formar un banco de imágenes para la Newsletter Aerolatino de Geba (creada y dirigida por nuestro querido Augusto Lapeyre)
Los espero a todos, Cris....

Cristina Rivera
estudio fotográfico
www.cristinarivera.com.ar

Caritas Bailadores de Geba, 28 diciembre 2007:

Cena y Baile viernes 28diciembre2007, en Geba San Martín [Foto Cristina Rivera] Cena y Baile viernes 28diciembre2007, en Geba San Martín [Foto Cristina Rivera] Cena y Baile viernes 28diciembre2007, en Geba San Martín [Foto Cristina Rivera] Cena y Baile viernes 28diciembre2007, en Geba San Martín [Foto Cristina Rivera] Charly Calatrava Angélica Manterola Roxana Rosso
Cena y Baile viernes 28diciembre2007, en Geba San Martín [Foto Cristina Rivera] Cena y Baile viernes 28diciembre2007, en Geba San Martín [Foto Cristina Rivera] Cristina Ochoa Cena y Baile viernes 28diciembre2007, en Geba San Martín [Foto Cristina Rivera] Cristina Rivera Cena y Baile viernes 28diciembre2007, en Geba San Martín [Foto Cristina Rivera] Cena y Baile viernes 28diciembre2007, en Geba San Martín [Foto Cristina Rivera] Susana Santórsola Cena y Baile viernes 28diciembre2007, en Geba San Martín [Foto Cristina Rivera] Claudia Tarazona Cena y Baile viernes 28diciembre2007, en Geba San Martín [Foto Cristina Rivera] Cena y Baile viernes 28diciembre2007, en Geba San Martín [Foto Cristina Rivera]

Fotos Estudio Cristina Rivera

Swing Argentino el 11 de Abril (Ana Luz Crespi)

Happy Feet sábado, 29 de marzo de 2008 13:57
Fiesta del 12abr2008 en Sarmiento 1272

Ana Luz Crespi

Hola Augusto, quería comentarte que se pospuso el estreno de Swing Argentino para el 11 de abril, a la misma hora y en el mismo lugar.

Un saludo enorme!
Ana

Ana Luz Crespi
Happy Feet
Keep on swingin'!
happy-feet.com.ar
lhaif.com.ar

Gracias por la información Ana !

Bailador ! Es en Arévalo 1376 a las 20.30

Ginger Rogers y Fred Astaire en "Swing Time"
Ginger Rogers y Fred Astaire en "Swing Time" [fuente]

Convención de Ritmos 10 y 11 de Mayo (Romina Samelnik)

sábado, 29 de marzo de 2008 00:44
RS INFO!!! 5ta CONVENCION DE RITMOS! 10 Y 11 DE MAYO!!!

Romina Samelnik

Adjunto te envio la info completa de la 5ta Convención de Ritmos de Romina Samelnik.

- Info General del Evento (archivo en word)
- Cronograma del Evento (archivo en jpg)

NO TE LA PODES PERDER!!!!

Cualquier consulta no dudes en comunicarte conmigo!
Saludos, NaTaLia!

Convención de Ritmos 10 y 11 de Mayo (Romina Samelnik)
Convención de Ritmos 10 y 11 de Mayo (Romina Samelnik)
rominasamelnik.com.ar

Canto, Curso Integral (Sabrina E. Márquez)

viernes, 28 de marzo de 2008 13:56
Canto (Curso Integral)

Sabrina E. Márquez

Hola August!! gemelo libriano..te mando la data de los talleres de canto que estoy realizando en zona norte y capital.

Saludiños caribeños!! SING SING SING

Muchas gracias por la información, Gran Showwoman !

- Bailador ! Sabrina es compañera clases de Tap y lleva el espíritu de Show puesto !

CANTO
TECNICA Y MUSICALIDAD

-En Abril comenzarán los talleres y cursos anuales de “Técnica y Musicalidad en el Canto”, que organiza Voice Group.
Estan dirigidos a jóvenes y adultos con y sin experiencia

LUGARES, DIAS Y HORARIOS

En CAPITAL:

Martes 18 a 19.30 hs.(1° grupo) 19.45 a 21.15 hs.(2° grupo)
COMIENZAN EL 8/4
Centro Cultural San Rafael, Ramallo 2606, Nuñez

En ZONA NORTE:

Lunes 20 a 22hs.
Centro Cultural del Árbol: Ituzaingo 590, San Isidro

Viernes 19 a 21hs.
San Isidro Automóvil Club: Av. Santa Fe 1733, Martínez

Consultar por clases individuales

Cupos limitados.
Inscripción previa : 4717-5703

eventosvoicegroup.com
Atte.
Voice Group

Sabrina E. Márquez
Cantante-Entrenadora Vocal
Tel/Fax: +54(11) 4717-5703 / 15 5738 9769

eventosvoicegroup.com

Avenue Q Spring Fever

viernes, 28 de marzo de 2008 08:44
"Avenue Q" Spring Fever: Only $46.50 with Playbill.com

Playbill Club Manager

Avenue Q Spring Fever
Avenue Q Spring Fever [fuente]
avenueq.com

Merce Cunningham Dance Company at the Harman Center for the Arts in Washington

The New York Times, March 29, 2008
Dance Review

The Dance Has a Meaning, but That’s Not the Point

[Linda Spillers for The New York Times]
Separate solos: the Cunningham dancers in “Second Hand.”
Linda Spillers for The New York Times
Separate solos: the Cunningham dancers in “Second Hand.” [fuente]
nytimes.com/2008/03/29/arts/dance/29seco.html

By ALASTAIR MACAULAY

WASHINGTON — When Merce Cunningham made “Second Hand” in 1970, he was already internationally established as the foremost nonballet creator of dances that were about dancing, that had no messages, that were, in Susan Sontag’s phrase, “against interpretation.”

Now, after an absence of some 36 years, “Second Hand” has been revived. In this task Mr. Cunningham has been assisted by his former dancers Carolyn Brown, Valda Setterfield and — in particular — Sandra Neels. And among the many marvelous features of the Merce Cunningham Dance Company’s Thursday night performance at the Harman Center for the Arts here was that “Second Hand” proved to be a full experience just as a dance about dancing, without needing to be combed for meanings.

I stress this with reason. Particularly in the years since “Second Hand” has fallen out of the repertory, it has become widely known that Mr. Cunningham actually had a secret subject matter and story in mind: nothing less than the death of Socrates. But, no, nobody drinks hemlock. And at the end the male protagonist is alone and upright.

The dance begins with an extended solo: Mr. Cunningham created this for himself, and today it is danced by Robert Swinston. You could tie yourself into knots deducing what this solo “says” about Socrates. What’s moving is its nonstop current, its sense of constant test and inquiry, and its physical diversity. Motion is always present in some part of the performer’s body (heel, neck, pelvis, shoulder, spine, thigh); the dynamics range from slow to sudden. Mr. Swinston, a central Cunningham dancer since 1980 and slightly older than Mr. Cunningham was when he danced it, is wonderfully focused: coolly objective and spiritually possessed at the same time.

One phrase stands out: a side-to-side step in which he raises a proclamatory arm (as if with inspiration and vision), then, changing his weight to the other foot, the other arm. A connective lyricism makes the gesture organic rather than just a headline.

Then he is joined for a long duet by a companion. (Alcibiades? Phaedrus? Don’t go there.) When Ms. Brown, Mr. Cunningham’s most celebrated and long-term stage partner, danced the 1970 premiere of this, she was distressed by a look of anguish in Mr. Cunningham’s eyes and assumed he had injured himself. Later John Cage, the composer of the score and the choreographer’s closest artistic colleague, explained to her what she had never known during rehearsals — that in “Second Hand” Mr. Cunningham was Socrates approaching his death.

We now know that Mr. Cunningham had planned to use Erik Satie’s “Socrate.” When the Satie estate prohibited this, Mr. Cage composed a piano score, called “Cheap Imitation,” that fit the work’s structures while — mainly picking out one note at a time — pursuing separate melodies. Mr. Cunningham’s title “Second Hand” reflected this process.

Much of this duet has something of the mood of a Socratic dialogue, though both dancers are moving at the same time, mainly in separate solos. The sense of two different characters is beautifully achieved: she seems winged and rapturous, he weighted, more limited, darker. There are brief incidents in which, like Socrates, he sees his energies seem to fail; but then, like Giselle in Act II of that ballet, she seems to bring him new energy.

Holley Farmer performed this role on Thursday. Though she has been a central Cunningham dancer of great range for more than 10 years, I was amazed to see the fluency of her dancing here, especially in one series of gamboling jumps. The duet ends with the couple running together round the stage, arms around each other’s waists, eyes locked.

The protagonist never leaves the stage in “Second Hand.” In the third and final section, he is joined by nine dancers, among whom the female companion of the duet is present but no longer pre-eminent. The costumes — which suggest a community of equals, with each dancer wearing tights of a single color, and which add up to a spectrum from red to yellow and green to blue — are by Jasper Johns, who at one time was artistic adviser to the Cunningham company. It’s a complex ensemble, of contained, calm and devout energies, in which solos sometimes lead to duets or trios.

Here the most dramatic feature is that the others almost never seem to see the protagonist. There are brief moments of vision and recognition across the stage, usually as if across a crowded room, but they pass. Yet he always sees them; moves among them; often does the same movement as they; weaves through them. (He even partners a woman or two, but they seem unaware of the fact.) At one point he repeats the slow, singing proclamation from his opening solo.

It’s easy to read this as the dead Socrates living on among the philosophers and friends who took up his teaching (Plato, Xenophon, et al.), which gives another point to the title “Second Hand,” but it might be the spirit of Christ dwelling among the apostles (and the dance might be about the disciples becoming apostles). And it could also be the story of any teacher-choreographer whose work is continued by those who no longer have direct access to the fount. But none of these meanings press themselves upon you as you watch.

In fact “Second Hand” has less “drama” — less pathos, contrast, urgency — than Mr. Cunningham’s “Quartet” (1982), in which he passed in intense but limited two-dimensional ways among four young dancers who, moving in impersonal, three-dimensional terms, never saw him, even when two sandwiched him. But “Second Hand” is a richer, more ambiguous and poetic work. At one point the nine form a tableau, a beautiful diagonal chain or garland across the stage; the protagonist observes them.

The company’s program in Washington is a triple bill. Even Mr. Cunningham’s “eyeSpace” (2006), though it is my least favorite work in the current repertory, continues to yield fascinating new details at each viewing. And “CRWDSPCR” (1993), which once struck me as the most robotic piece Mr. Cunningham had ever made, now looks blithe. Its intricacies are full of wit, suspense and breakthrough beauty.

The Merce Cunningham Dance Company performs on Saturday at the Harman Center for the Arts in Washington; (202) 547-1122.

nytimes.com/2008/03/29/arts/dance/29seco.html

Gypsy at the St. James Theater

The New York Times, March 28, 2008
THEATER REVIEW | ‘GYPSY’

Curtain Up! It’s Patti’s Turn at ‘Gypsy’

theater.nytimes.com/2008/03/28 ... ews/28gyps.html

[Sara Krulwich/The New York Times]
"Gypsy," with Patti LuPone as Momma Rose, opened at the St. James Theater.
Sara Krulwich/The New York Times
"Gypsy," with Patti LuPone as Momma Rose, opened at the St. James Theater. [fuente]
theater.nytimes.com/2008/03/28 ... ews/28gyps.html

[Sara Krulwich/The New York Times]
Chez “Gypsy”: Patti LuPone, center, as Momma Rose, with Laura Benanti and Boyd Gaines.
Sara Krulwich/The New York Times
Chez “Gypsy”: Patti LuPone, center, as Momma Rose, with Laura Benanti and Boyd Gaines. [fuente]
theater.nytimes.com/2008/03/28 ... ews/28gyps.html

By BEN BRANTLEY

Watch out, New York. Patti LuPone has found her focus. And when Ms. LuPone is truly focused, she’s a laser, she incinerates. Especially when she’s playing someone as dangerously obsessed as Momma Rose in the wallop-packing revival of the musical “Gypsy,” which opened on Thursday night at the St. James Theater.

In July, when an earlier version of “Gypsy” starring Ms. LuPone had a limited run as part of the Encores! summer series, this powerhouse actress gave a diffuse, narcissistic performance that seemed to be watching itself in a mirror. She was undeniably Patti with an exclamation point, the musical cult goddess, offering her worshipers plenty of polished brass, ululating notes and winking sexiness. But Rose, the ultimate stage mother of Gypsy Rose Lee’s memoirs, was as yet only a wavering gleam in her eye.

What a difference eight or nine months makes. And yes, that quiet crunching sound you hear is me eating my hat. As directed by Arthur Laurents, this latest incarnation of “Gypsy,” the 1959 fable of the last days of vaudeville, shines with a magnified transparency that lets you see right down to the naked core of characters so hungry for attention that it warps them.

The notion of a bare soul only flimsily disguised is appropriate to “Gypsy,” which features a book by Mr. Laurents, music by Jule Styne and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim. The title character, after all, is a burlesque queen, embodied here in the charming flesh of Laura Benanti, who obliges with examples of the ecdysiast’s art in the second act.

But the most transfixing stripteases are characters peeling down, by seductive degrees, to their most primal selves. What’s revealed isn’t nearly as pretty as a young Minsky dancer’s body. But its raw power should be enough to silence any naysayers (myself included), who thought that 2008 was way too early for yet another Broadway revival of “Gypsy,” which had been staged less than five years ago with a revelatory Bernadette Peters.

The 90-year-old Mr. Laurents, who directed two earlier revivals of “Gypsy” (with Angela Lansbury and Tyne Daly), has had nearly half a century to ponder characters he helped bring to life. The accumulation of decades seems only to have sharpened his vision of the fractured family at the show’s center: Rose, the smothering mother determined to make a star out of at least one of her children; Herbie (Boyd Gaines), the gentlemanly candy salesman and reluctant theatrical agent who loves her; and her two daughters, June and Louise (played as adults by Leigh Ann Larkin and Ms. Benanti).

For there is very little sentimental mist here. The show’s flat, scrappy look (with sets by James Youmans and costumes by Martin Pakledinaz), relying heavily on hand-painted scrims and backdrops, summons a world with the depth of torn paper and the glamour of disintegrating curtains.

If we are always aware of the shabbiness of the cut-rate vaudeville circuit through which Rose drags her increasingly discontented brood, we are also aware of the double-edged romance with which she invests that world. From the get-go, Ms. LuPone exudes a sweet-and-sweaty air of hope and desperation, balancing on an unsteady seesaw.

Watching that balance shift is a source of wonder, amusement and even pity and terror. If in the Encores! version of “Gypsy,” Ms. LuPone seemed to be trying on and discarding different aspects of Rose as if they were party hats, she has now settled on a single, highly disciplined interpretation that combines explosively contradictory elements into a single, deceptively ordinary-looking package.

It’s as if the new wig she wears here — a ’30s-style mop of recalcitrant curls that is a vast improvement on her blunt bowl cut of last summer — had forced her to internalize her many ideas about what makes Rose run. And while Rose may be a dauntingly single-minded creature, Ms. LuPone now plays her less on one note than any actress I’ve seen.

This Rose begins as a busy, energetic, excited woman, and you can’t help being infected by her liveliness. You understand why Herbie would be smitten with her, and for once, his description of her as looking “like a pioneer woman without a frontier” fits perfectly. But every so often a darker, creepier willpower erupts, as involuntary as a hiccup.

In Rose’s two great curtain numbers, “Everything’s Coming Up Roses” and “Rose’s Turn,” the darkness takes over so completely that you feel that you’re watching a woman who has been peeled down to her unadorned id. In “Rose’s Turn,” in particular, Ms. LuPone takes you on a guided tour of all Rose’s inner demons, from sexual succubus to shivering infant. (Be warned: they will live in your head for a while.)

A great Momma Rose is usually enough for a thoroughly compelling “Gypsy.” But this one has so much more. Mr. Laurents and his cast have applied the same careful analysis to all the major characters. As a result we become newly sensitized to “Gypsy” as a sad story of colliding desires, of people within an extended family vainly longing for love, for security, for recognition from one another. And this production makes us painfully aware of the toll exacted by repeatedly missed connections.

I have never, for example, seen a Herbie as palpably in love or in pain as the one the excellent Mr. Gaines provides.

Nor has the relationship between June, on whom Rose has pinned her highest ambitions, and the neglected Louise ever been as fully drawn as it is by Ms. Larkin and Ms. Benanti. Their duet, “If Momma Was Married,” becomes a vibrant voyage of gleeful self-discovery between two alienated siblings.

Ms. Larkin brings out the toughness in June that marks her as her mother’s daughter. (She’s hilarious furtively flashing her sex appeal behind Rose’s back.) And Ms. Benanti, in the performance of her career, traces Louise’s path to becoming her mother’s daughter out of necessity. The transformation of the waifish Louise into the vulpine Gypsy Rose Lee is completely convincing. And you’re acutely aware of what’s lost and gained in the metamorphoses.

You see, everyone’s starved for attention in “Gypsy.” That craving, after all, is the motor that keeps showbiz puttering along. And Mr. Laurents makes sure that we sense that hunger in everyone, including the delightfully seedy trio of strippers who initiate Gypsy into their art (Alison Fraser, Lenora Nemetz and Marilyn Caskey) and Tulsa (a first-rate Tony Yazbeck), a member of Rose’s troupe who dares to strike out on his own.

Styne’s score, one of the best for any show ever, is given full due by the orchestra (though I don’t see why it’s been left onstage à la Encores!). But I was so caught up in the emotional wrestling matches between the characters (and within themselves), that I didn’t really think about the songs as songs.

When Ms. LuPone delivers “Rose’s Turn,” she’s building a bridge for an audience to walk right into one woman’s nervous breakdown. There is no separation at all between song and character, which is what happens in those uncommon moments when musicals reach upward to achieve their ideal reasons to be. This “Gypsy” spends much of its time in such intoxicating air.

GYPSY

Book by Arthur Laurents, suggested by the memoirs of Gypsy Rose Lee; music by Jule Styne; lyrics by Stephen Sondheim; directed by Mr. Laurents; choreography by Jerome Robbins, reproduced by Bonnie Walker; music director-arranger, Patrick Vaccariello; sets by James Youmans; costumes by Martin Pakledinaz; lighting by Howell Binkley; sound by Dan Moses Schreier; production stage manager, Craig Jacobs; orchestrations by Sid Ramin and Robert Ginzler; dance arrangements by John Kander; music coordinator, Seymour Red Press. Presented by Roger Berlind, the Routh-Frankel-Baruch-Viertel Group, Roy Furman, Debra Black, Ted Hartley, Roger Horchow, David Ian, Scott Rudin and Jack Viertel. At the St. James Theater, 246 West 44th Street, Manhattan; (212) 239-6200. Running time: 2 hours 30 minutes.

WITH: Patti LuPone (Rose), Boyd Gaines (Herbie), Laura Benanti (Louise), Leigh Ann Larkin (Dainty June), Tony Yazbeck (Tulsa), Marilyn Caskey (Electra), Alison Fraser (Tessie Tura) and Lenora Nemetz (Mazeppa/Miss Cratchitt).

Multimedia

Slide Show (7 Photos) Rose's Turn

Slide Show (7 Photos)
Rose's Turn

Related

Sing Out, Laura. It’s Your Turn. (March 23, 2008)
Patti’s Turn, if Not Always Rose’s (August 5, 2007)
Theater Review | 'Gypsy': What Ever Happened to Momma Rose? (July 16, 2007)
Times Topics: Patti Lupone
Times Topics: Arthur Laurents

Gone with the Wind, the Musical, at the New London Theatre

Gone with the Wind, the Musical, at the New London Theatre
Gone with the Wind, the Musical, at the New London Theatre [fuente]

About The Show

GONE WITH THE WIND - one of the greatest love stories of all time has now been adapted for the stage and will open at the New London Theatre in April 2008.

This landmark new musical is directed by the legendary Trevor Nunn who reunites with designer John Napier, his collaborator on worldwide smash hits including Cats and Les Misérables. The stunning original score is by Margaret Martin who has also adapted the story from Margaret Mitchell’s Pulitzer Prize winning novel.

Set in 1860’s Atlanta GONE WITH THE WIND follows the captivating and passionate story of Scarlett O’Hara and her turbulent relationship with the unpredictable, yet irresistible, Rhett Butler. Against the backdrop of the Civil War Scarlett embarks on an incredible journey of romantic ecstasy and tragic grief spanning ten years. As the epic tale draws to a close Scarlett discovers that the world she has known has changed forever – gone with the wind.

Creative Team

Aldo Scrofani Colin Ingram Gary McAvay Nederlander Producing Inc. Peter Kanepresent

GONE WITH THE WIND

Based on the novel by Margaret Mitchell

Book and Lyrics by Margaret Martin adapted by Trevor Nunn

Music by Margaret Martin

Designer John Napier

Cast

RHETT BUTLER Darius Danesh
SCARLETT O’ HARA Jill Paice
ASHLEY WILKES Edward Baker-Duly
MELANIE HAMILTON Madeleine Worrall
MAMMY NaTasha Yvette Williams
PRISSY Jina Burrows
GERALD O’HARA Julian Forsyth
ELLEN O’HARA Susannah Fellows
PORK Ray Shell
DILCEY Jacqueline Boatswain
UNCLE PETER Leon Herbert
BIG SAM Chris Jarman
MRS MERRYWEATHER Susan Tracy
JOHN WILKES Jeff Shankley
MRS MEADE Kathryn Akin
AUNT PITTYPAT Susan Jane Tanner
FRANK KENNEDY Alan Vicary
CHARLES HAMILTON David Roberts
CADE CALVERT Alan Winner
STUART TARLETON Gareth Chart
BRENT TARLETON Tom Sellwood
SUELLEN O’HARA Emily Bryant
CAREEN O’HARA Gemma Sutton
INDIA WILKES Kirsty Hoiles
DIMITY MUNTO Laura Checkley
HONEY Lorraine Chappell
CATHERINE Savannah Stevenson
TONY FONTAINE Derek Hagen
COOKIE Jenessa Qua
JONAS WILKERSON Tober Reilly
PAUL WILSON Ian Conningham
PROPHET Horace Oliver
SWING Chloe-Jean Bishop
SWING Nolan Frederick
SWING Rosalind James

Performance Times

Monday evenings 7pm
(7.30pm for performances before 22 April)
Tuesday to Saturday evenings 7.30pm
Wednesday and Saturday Matinees 2.30pm (from 12 April)

Booking

Seat Prices
£60.00, £50.00, £32.50, £27.50
£10 off all prices during preview performances – 5 to 21 April

Links:

gwtwthemusical.com
newlondontheatre.co.uk

Teatro en el Consejo de Ciencias Económicas (Sandra G. Mattesco)

miércoles, 26 de marzo de 2008 14:00
Actividades culturales semana 31 de marzo

Comisión de Cultura

Buenas tardes Sr. Augusto Lapeyre,

Le paso la programación de la próxima semana que se realizarán en el Consejo Profesional de Cs. Económicas C.A.B.A.

Muchas gracias por la difusión, lo saluda atte.

Sandra G. Mattesco

Martes 1 de abril – 19:00 hs.
Cine-Debate Coord. Dr. C.P. Luis Cortés:
La Conquista del Honor
Con Jesse Bradford, Melanie Lynskey, Robert Patrick
Dirigida por Clint Eastwood

Viernes 4 de abril - 19:45 hs.
La Nona
De Roberto Cossa
Espectáculo teatral
Con la actuación del Grupo de Teatro del Consejo
Coordinación: Dra. C.P. Beatriz A. Viladessau

La Nona
De Roberto Cossa
Espectáculo teatral La Nona
De Roberto Cossa
Espectáculo teatral La Nona
De Roberto Cossa
Espectáculo teatral La Nona
De Roberto Cossa
Espectáculo teatral La Nona
De Roberto Cossa
Espectáculo teatral

Dance Teacher Summer Conference

miércoles, 26 de marzo de 2008 14:12
DTSC from A to Z

Dance Teacher Summer Conference

Dance Teacher Summer Conference 2008
Dance Teacher Summer Conference 2008 [fuente]
dance-teacher.com/conference/register

Presale 2008 Radio City Christmas Spectacular

miércoles, 26 de marzo de 2008 07:03
Buy Tickets Now for the 2008 Christmas Spectacular!

Radio City Christmas Spectacular Insider

PRESALE 3/26 – 4/19

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Radio City Music Hall in New York City
November 7 – December 30

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"If you've never seen it, go. If you have seen it before, go again"
– Daily News

Learn more about the show at RadioCityChristmas.com.

christmas.radiocity.com/?s7242 ... 768t7257n35043e

Swing Dance. Rusty and her Rhythm

martes, 25 de marzo de 2008 16:23
Newsletter & Balboa Workshop THIS Sunday

Rusty And Her Rhythm Pals

Lindy By The Sea Newsletter

rustyfrank.com/newsletter/08-03-25.asp

Can People Regenerate Body Parts?

martes, 25 de marzo de 2008 13:30
Weekly Review: Can People Regenerate Body Parts?

Scientific American Newsletters

Regrowing Limbs: Can People Regenerate Body Parts?

The gold standard for limb regeneration is the salamander, which can grow perfect replacements for lost body parts throughout its lifetime. Understanding how can provide a road map for human limb regeneration.

The early responses of tissues at an amputation site are not that different in salamanders and in humans, but eventually human tissues form a scar, whereas the salamander's reactivate an embryonic development program to build a new limb... [ more ] sciam.com/article.cfm?id=regro ... ing-human-limbs

In The Heights A New Musical

martes, 25 de marzo de 2008 12:47
In the Heights Newsletter

In The Heights

Young Frankestein at the Hilton Theatre

martes, 25 de marzo de 2008 08:14
"Young Frankenstein" Ticket Offer - Save with Playbill.com

Playbill Club Manager

Young Frankestein at the Hilton Theatre
Young Frankestein at the Hilton Theatre
ticketmaster.com/artist/112476 ... bdwy_rec_image8

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Regularly $120 (orchestra & dress circle),
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Offer available April 1-May 25, for the following performance times:
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Or, bring a printout of this offer to the
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Mel Brooks’ comedy masterpiece is ALIVE… and it’s BROADWAY'S MONSTER HIT! Don't miss sensational stars ROGER BART (The Producers ) and MEGAN MULLALLY (“Will and Grace”), together with SUTTON FOSTER, SHULER HENSLEY, ANDREA MARTIN, FRED APPLEGATE and CHRISTOPHER FITZGERALD, delivering all your favorite moments from the classic movie, plus brand-new show-stopping numbers for the Broadway stage, including “Transylvania Mania,” “He Vas My Boyfriend” and “Puttin’ On The Ritz.”

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YoungFrankensteinTheMusical.com

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Astaire & Rogers, 5: Follow the Fleet (1936)

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Follow the Fleet: imdb.com/title/tt0027630

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directed by Mark Sandrich
USA 1936

All hands on deck! In the fifth of 10 Astaire/Rogers pairings, Fred trades his top hat for a sailor's cap, Randolph Scott gets the girl (pre-Nelson Harriet Hilliard), Ginger gets a tap solo and viewers get the unending delight of seven sparkling Irving Berlin numbers, including Let Yourself Go, We Saw the Sea, the Duo's zany I'm Putting All My Eggs in One Basket skit and their sublimely powerful Let's Face the Music and Dance. Astaire is Bake Baker, a hoofer now given to stepping a sailor's horn-pipe while he and other swabbies patrol the seas for democracy. Rogers is his former partner Sherry, now convoying the Navy around a ballroom for 10 cents a dance. But one day the fleet returns to home port. Bake again meets Sherry, and the partnership is renewed at least for one more show. In small early-career roles, look for a very blond Lucille Ball and a very young Betty Grable !

Posters

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DVD Menus

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dvdbeaver.com/film/DVDReviews1 ... _collection.htm

Subtitle Sample

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Screen Captures

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Posters

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imdb.com/media/rm2563283456/tt0027630

Vintage Film Poster

Links

Point Break (1991): imdb.com/title/tt0102685
Kathryn Bigelow Director (1951): imdb.com/name/nm0958387
Patrick Swayze (1952): imdb.com/name/nm0000664
Kanu Reves (1964): imdb.com/name/nm0000206

imdb.com/media/rm578264576/tt0102685

El Logotipo de Hoy

Title: Gone with the Wind
Names: Clark Gable, Vivien Leigh
Characters: Scarlett O'Hara, Rhett Butler

imdb.com/media/rm2672859392/tt0031381

Coplita

Es tanto lo que te quiero,
y lo que te quiero es tanto,
que el rato que no te veo,
no rezo pa ningún santo.

Fuente:
Jorge M. Furt
Cancionero Popular Rioplatense: Lírica Gauchesca Tomo II
Alicante : Biblioteca Virtual Miguel de Cervantes, 2003
Edición digital basada en la de Buenos Aires, Imprenta y Casa Editora "Coni", 1925.
cervantesvirtual.com/servlet/S ... 91/p0000006.htm
[1962 (Santiago del Estero).]

Imágenes de Salida

National Gallery of Art, 4th and Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, D.C.

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec
French, 1864 - 1901
Jane Avril, 1892
oil on cardboard mounted on wood, 67.8 x 52.9 cm (26 3/4 x 20 7/8 in.)
Chester Dale Collection
1963.10.66
Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec
French, 1864 - 1901
Jane Avril, 1892
oil on cardboard mounted on wood, 67.8 x 52.9 cm (26 3/4 x 20 7/8 in.)
Chester Dale Collection
1963.10.66 [fuente]
nga.gov/cgi-bin/pimage?46258_0_0

Arte al Dia Internacional, 14 de Junio de 2007 Newsletter semanal artealdia.com
EL SITIO RECOMENDADO antoniaguzman.com.ar/index.htm

Antonia Guzmán
The Announcement/ El Anuncio
2008
32 x 40 inches
painting, acrylic on canvas
Antonia Guzmán
The Announcement/ El Anuncio
2008
32 x 40 inches
painting, acrylic on canvas

The New York Times, 07 March 2008, Color As Field: American Painting

[Photo: San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, courtesy American Federation of Arts]
“Interior Landscape” (1964) by Helen Frankenthaler
The stain technique was the innovation of Helen Frankenthaler. It negotiated a common ground between Pollock’s heroic no-brush drip style and the expanses of saturated color favored especially by Barnett Newman and Mark Rothko.
Photo: San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, courtesy American Federation of Arts
“Interior Landscape” (1964) by Helen Frankenthaler
The stain technique was the innovation of Helen Frankenthaler. It negotiated a common ground between Pollock’s heroic no-brush drip style and the expanses of saturated color favored especially by Barnett Newman and Mark Rothko. [fuente]
nytimes.com/slideshow/2008/03/ ... 307-COLO_4.html

“Color as Field: American Painting, 1950-1975” is at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Eighth and F Streets, NW, Washington, (202) 633-7970, through May 26

Arte al Dia Internacional, 15 de Noviembre de 2007 Newsletter semanal artealdia.com
EL SITIO RECOMENDADO pablodimasso.com.ar

Pablo Di Masso
HOMBRE COMPACTO
2006
12 x 15 cm
Pablo Di Masso
HOMBRE COMPACTO
2006
12 x 15 cm
pablodimasso.com.ar

THE NEW YORK TIMES, 14 FEBRUARY 2008
Poussin and Nature: Arcadian Visions

[Photo: Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid]
Nicolas Poussin (1594-1665): "Landscape with Saint Jerome"
Soon enough prestigious jobs, including an altarpiece for St. Peter’s, came his way, and in 1640 he was invited to return to France as official painter to Louis XIII. But he disliked court life. Within two years he was back in Rome, working for a small circle of patrons who shared his fascination with science, neo-Classical philosophy and politics. Poussin gradually detached himself from public life. He went into retreat and put his art into reverse, bringing what had once been background forward, concentrating on the subject he cared most about, nature.
Photo: Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid
Nicolas Poussin (1594-1665): "Landscape with Saint Jerome"
Soon enough prestigious jobs, including an altarpiece for St. Peter’s, came his way, and in 1640 he was invited to return to France as official painter to Louis XIII. But he disliked court life. Within two years he was back in Rome, working for a small circle of patrons who shared his fascination with science, neo-Classical philosophy and politics. Poussin gradually detached himself from public life. He went into retreat and put his art into reverse, bringing what had once been background forward, concentrating on the subject he cared most about, nature. [fuente]
nytimes.com/slideshow/2008/02/ ... 215-POUS_6.html

Christie's, SCOTTISH ART, Sale 5306, 16 Apr 2008, London, South Kensington

George Leslie Hunter (1877-1931)
Houseboats, Loch Lomond
signed 'L Hunter' (lower left)
oil on canvas
20 x 24 in. (50.8 x 61 cm.)
Painted circa 1930.
George Leslie Hunter (1877-1931)
Houseboats, Loch Lomond
signed 'L Hunter' (lower left)
oil on canvas
20 x 24 in. (50.8 x 61 cm.)
Painted circa 1930. [fuente]
christies.com/LotFinder/lot_de ... bjectID=5054869

Price Realized
£144,500 ($284,232)
Estimate
£120,000 - £160,000 ($236,520 - $315,360)
Sale Information
Sale 5306
Scottish Art
16 April 2008
London, South Kensington

THE NEW YORK SUN 26 MARCH 2008

[KONRAD FIEDLER]
SMILE At the Kaikai Kiki studio, an artist works on one of Murakami’s pop paintings.
KONRAD FIEDLER
SMILE At the Kaikai Kiki studio, an artist works on one of Murakami’s pop paintings. [fuente]

THE NEW YORK SUN 26 MARCH 2008

[F LO M E N H A F T G A L L E RY]
LEADING LADY The paintings and multimedia work of Miriam Schapiro reflect one woman’s exploration of identity. A retrospective at the Flomenhaft Gallery illustrates the long arc of her career. Her early paintings from the 1950s suggest her personal struggle, yet when she later became a leader of the feminist art movement, her work shifted to a more joyful expression of womanhood. Her interest in diverse cultures led her to create a series of dazzling fans and mythic dramas.
F LO M E N H A F T G A L L E RY
LEADING LADY The paintings and multimedia work of Miriam Schapiro reflect one woman’s exploration of identity. A retrospective at the Flomenhaft Gallery illustrates the long arc of her career. Her early paintings from the 1950s suggest her personal struggle, yet when she later became a leader of the feminist art movement, her work shifted to a more joyful expression of womanhood. Her interest in diverse cultures led her to create a series of dazzling fans and mythic dramas. [fuente]

Through Saturday, April 26, Flomenhaft Gallery, 547 W. 27th St., between Tenth and Eleventh avenues, 212-268-4953, free.

THE NEW YORK SUN 27 MARCH 2008

[M G M ST U D I O S
H U LTO N A RC H I V E
G E T T Y I M A G ES]
TAKE THE HIGH GROUND’ Richard Widmark (1915-2008) as Thorne Ryan
M G M ST U D I O S
H U LTO N A RC H I V E
G E T T Y I M A G ES

TAKE THE HIGH GROUND’ Richard Widmark (1915-2008) as Thorne Ryan [fuente]

THE NEW YORK SUN 27 MARCH 2008

[H UN G A R I A N C U LT U RA L C E N T E R]
PAINTINGS
20th-CENTURY LIFETIME Tamás Lossonczy’s remarkable career is defined by the political and artistic trends of his lifetime; the many movements he is associated with include the Group of Socialist Artists, the European School, and the Hungarian Group of Abstract Artists. His career began after he graduated from art school in 1926, and alternated between creating paintings on his own, and working on Soviet-commissioned architecture during the 1940s. Now 103, Mr. Lossonczy’s first solo show was mounted in 1943, and in 1994, he won Hungary’s highest artistic award, the Kossuth Prize. Selections from an exhibit of paintings from the collection of investor and philanthropist George Soros include an untitled work (c. 1940s), above.
H UN G A R I A N C U LT U RA L C E N T E R
PAINTINGS
20th-CENTURY LIFETIME Tamás Lossonczy’s remarkable career is defined by the political and artistic trends of his lifetime; the many movements he is associated with include the Group of Socialist Artists, the European School, and the Hungarian Group of Abstract Artists. His career began after he graduated from art school in 1926, and alternated between creating paintings on his own, and working on Soviet-commissioned architecture during the 1940s. Now 103, Mr. Lossonczy’s first solo show was mounted in 1943, and in 1994, he won Hungary’s highest artistic award, the Kossuth Prize. Selections from an exhibit of paintings from the collection of investor and philanthropist George Soros include an untitled work (c. 1940s), above. [fuente]

Through Monday, May 5, Monday–Friday, 9:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m., Hungarian Cultural Center, 447 Broadway, between Howard and Grand streets, 212-750-4450, free

THE NEW YORK TIMES, 27 MARCH 2008
Heinrich Zille (1858-1929)

[Photo: Images provided by Academy of Arts Berlin]
"Women in the Pub," by Heinrich Zille, 1909
Michael Kimmelman writes: “Onstage and in various exhibitions Berlin this year has been celebrating the 150th anniversary of the birth of Heinrich Zille.”
Photo: Images provided by Academy of Arts Berlin
"Women in the Pub," by Heinrich Zille, 1909
Michael Kimmelman writes: “Onstage and in various exhibitions Berlin this year has been celebrating the 150th anniversary of the birth of Heinrich Zille.” [fuente]
nytimes.com/2008/03/27/arts/de ... gn/27zille.html

THE NEW YORK SUN 28 MARCH 2008

[S OT H E BY’ S]
COLOR AND SHAPE Sotheby’s sale of Contemporary art on April 2 will include Alexander Calder’s ‘Blue Moon’ (1975), estimated at between $30,000 and $50,000.
S OT H E BY’ S
COLOR AND SHAPE Sotheby’s sale of Contemporary art on April 2 will include Alexander Calder’s ‘Blue Moon’ (1975), estimated at between $30,000 and $50,000. [fuente]

THE NEW YORK SUN 28 MARCH 2008

SHOOT FIRST Charlie Chaplin co-founded United Artists in 1919.
SHOOT FIRST Charlie Chaplin co-founded United Artists in 1919. [fuente]

THE NEW YORK SUN 31 MARCH 2008

[J . PAT C A RT E R/A P]
DISAPPOINTING FINISH Ana Ivanovic lost Lindsay Davenport 6–4, 6–2 at the Sony Ericsson Open.
J . PAT C A RT E R/A P
DISAPPOINTING FINISH Ana Ivanovic lost Lindsay Davenport 6–4, 6–2 at the Sony Ericsson Open. [fuente]

THE NEW YORK SUN 01 APRIL 2008

[P H I L L I P S D E P U RY]
HAMMER TIME The art world moved from the Armory Show, which closed on Sunday, to Phillips de Pury for yesterday’s sale of Contemporary art. Christoph Ruckhäberle’s ‘Big Mask’ sold for $12,500. For more results, please see page 19.
P H I L L I P S D E P U RY
HAMMER TIME The art world moved from the Armory Show, which closed on Sunday, to Phillips de Pury for yesterday’s sale of Contemporary art. Christoph Ruckhäberle’s ‘Big Mask’ sold for $12,500. For more results, please see page 19. [fuente]

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