"Newsletter" Aerolatino-Geba
(Aerolatino y todas las Danzas que se practican en Geba)
exclusiva para suscriptores, mié 23 julio 2008
Reciben esta Newsletter 475 suscriptores

MAMA MIA!
MAMA MIA!

The Royal Ballet of Flanders at the Lincoln Center Festival

The New York Sun, 21 July 2008
DANCE

The Three-Ring Circus of ‘Czar’

[WILLIE DAVIS]
Emilie Ngyuyen and Euginy Kolesnik from the Royal Ballet of Flanders in the second act of the ballet.
WILLIE DAVIS
Emilie Ngyuyen and Euginy Kolesnik from the Royal Ballet of Flanders in the second act of the ballet. [fuente]

By JOEL LOBENTHAL

Kudos to Kathryn Bennetts, the artistic director of the Royal Ballet of Flanders since 2005, who put her company into international circulation with a revival of William Forsythe’s 1988 three-act “Impressing the Czar,” which came to the Lincoln Center Festival last week. For 15 years, beginning in 1989, Ms. Bennetts was Mr. Forsythe’s ballet mistress at Ballett Frankfurt. Not seen since 1995, “Czar” was revived by the Flanders company in 2006 and has since become its global calling card and perhaps breadwinner.

Mr. Forsythe knows the value of a saleable gimmick; he is a clever showman, whose formula of reinventing the Dada wheel, combined with his own brand of balletic neoclassicism, has coalesced into a distinctive statement. He created “Czar” as a sort of wraparound enclosure for “In the Middle, Somewhat Elevated,” which he’d made for the Paris Opera in 1987. It registers as a scrambled parallel to multi-act grands ballets of the 19th century.

Act 1 of Mr. Forsythe’s “Czar” is a three-ring circus evoking the ancien régime and its love affair with ballet. The simultaneity of nonsequential action evokes the monarchial chessboard surrealism of “Alice in Wonderland,” as well as the gibbering bedlam of “Marat/Sade” inmates. Costumes encompass fluttery, frock-coated dancing masters and ball-gown-clad women on pointe. The music combines Beethoven with the consuming aural soundscapes to which Mr. Forsythe is partial. There are a lot of identical twin pairings, a lot of echoing, and a lot of choral interludes by a balletic ensemble dressed in elegant practice wear. Actress Helen Pickett bustles around in schoolgirl short skirt and stock-tie blouse, a kind of stage manager/traffic director, as well as audience stand-in. Her dialogue continually clues us into her interlocutory detachment from the onstage spectacle. Much of Ms. Pickett’s patter has to do with the well-being and whereabouts of a Mr. Pnut, danced by Jim De Block as a Cupid/Pan figure in a skirt and holding a crossbow. Perhaps he represents a kind of life force, a procreative potency, society’s cultural as well as biological inheritance. And he is certainly an emblem of commercialism.

Act 2 is “In the Middle” pure and simple. The company did well with it by not overdoing the insolence and thus preventing the whole thing from turning entirely into an exercise in cool-kids snootiness. They also gave the movement texture and friction, rather than taking the easy way out via excessively facile joint rotation and limb extension.

The third act of “Czar” is divided into three sections. First there is an auction, presided over by Ms. Pickett, who races along as if infected with a bit of Red Queen mania. Here she functions as the archetypal raisonneur of drama and farce, a mouthpiece for the author’s own sentiments. Mr. Forsythe has done some tweaking of the original for the revival, and last week Ms. Pickett’s patter took aim at the tanking American economy and the lack of government funding for the arts. Everyone onstage, including hapless Mr. Pnut, is sold off.

In the third act’s second scene, the entire company is now dressed as Ms. Pickett was in the opening act. Why are the men in drag? Well, why shouldn’t they be? Mr. Forsythe doesn’t seem to be saying anything in particular here, but he’s tossed a new gag into the mix. The ensemble snakes around the stage in a processional, skipping in little jumps. This might be a reference to what is sometimes perceived as the proto-minimalism of Petipa’s 1877 Kingdom of the Shades in “La Bayadère.” Certainly the shades and other transfigured Nirvanas of 19th-century Romanticism instantly make their presence felt. Mr. Pnut is flat on his back pierced by an arrow. Does all this revelry constitute a sort of funeral game? In the final section, Mr. Pnut is resurrected and alternately leads and eludes the snaking stompers.

“Czar” is an eyeful and a stageful, and it provides a fecund compendium of Mr. Forsythe’s trademark tropesandphilosophicalconcerns. The Flanders company pulls it off with panache.

Seminario "El Lenguaje de Bob Fosse" (Karina Roldán)

lunes, 21 de julio de 2008 08:19
Hola Augusto, te envío mi data para el Newsletter, muchas gracias y un beso enorme!

Karina Roldán

"El lenguaje de Bob Fosse"

Seminario dictado por
Karina Roldán
bailarina, coreógrafa y directora de la compañía "vis-à-vis"

// Domingos 10, 17, 24 y 31 de Agosto // 15 a 17 hs //
// Open Gallo // Gallo 241 //

Vacantes limitadas
Inscribite llamando al 15-4161-9031 o vía mail a:
// //

SEMINARIO INTENSIVO FOSSE
SEMINARIO INTENSIVO FOSSE

Sabah Al Nur (Tatiana Jazmín Schiel)

domingo, 20 de julio de 2008 19:58

Tatiana Jazmín Schiel

hola a todos!!! a pesar de que a algunos no los veo muy seguido, Les deseo un muy feliz día del amigo!!! y ojalá hayan pasado un hermoso día junto a las personas que quieren. Recuerden que no importa la cantidad de amigos que tengamos sino la calidad de esa amistad.
Los quiero mucho!!!

SABAH AL NUR (en árabe significa que tengas un día de luz).

BESOS TATI

Feliz Día !!!! (Enrique Carmona)

domingo, 20 de julio de 2008 10:32
"UN ARCHIVO Q TE MERECES"

Enrique Carmona

feliz dia!!!!!!!!

Bailador ! Enrique nos envía en adjunto "Las Mejores Cosas de la Vida", que también podés ver en: slideshare.net/promosmx.com/la ... -la-vida-216519

¡ Que Vivan Los Novios ! (Cristina Rivera)

sábado, 19 de julio de 2008 15:43
QUE VIVAN LOS NOVIOS!!!

Cristina Rivera

Hola Agus y todo Geba.
Hoy, cuando lo que priva es la falta de compromiso, el no sostener la palabra, las contradicciones entre los dichos y los hechos, Inés y Bernard nos demuestran que es posible volver a creer y que apostar a la felicidad de a dos, está bueno!!!
QUE VIVAN LOS NOVIOS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Cristina Rivera

¡ Excelentes documentos, Cris ! ¡ Muchas gracias por el aporte !

¡Qué vivan los novios!

Un Gran Abrazo Amigos (Enrique Varela)

sábado, 19 de julio de 2008 04:15
AMIGOS

Enrique Varela

UN GRAN ABRAZO,AMIGOS
Enrique

Mariage (Inés Araujo)

viernes, 18 de julio de 2008 18:19
Mariage

Inés Araujo

Hola Augusto!!! Bernard y yo queremos anunciarles a todos los amigos de Aerolatino y lectores de la Newsletter que hoy viernes 18 hemos contraido matrimonio después de una fructífera relación de dos años y medio, estamos muy felices y esperamos poder compartir mañana sábado los festejos del día del amigo.

Te mandamos un saludo cordial Inés y Bernard

Cena y Baile viernes 28diciembre2007, en Geba San Martín [Foto Cristina Rivera]
Cena y Baile viernes 28diciembre2007, en Geba San Martín Foto Cristina Rivera

Felicitaciones Inés y Bernard !
¡ Que compartan muchos bailes divertidos !

Convención 2008 (Adrián Andreani)

viernes, 18 de julio de 2008 09:03
INFO EVENTO AA 2008

Adrián Andriani

LES ENVIO LA INFO DE MI CONVENCIÓN 2008.
ABRAZO
AA.

Convención 2008 (Adrián Andreani)
Convención 2008 (Adrián Andreani)

Amigo (Liliana Toscano)

jueves, 17 de julio de 2008 20:43
AMIGO, ES BREVE

Liliana Toscano

QUERIDOS AMIGOS: HOY ES VIERNES Y TAL VEZ NO ESTEMOS TODOS PRESENTES EL DOMINGO EN LA PANTALLA..... POR ESO RECIBAN ESTE BONITO MSJ......Y SEPAN QUE LOS QUIERO MUCHO Y QUE SIEMPRE ESTÀN PEGADITOS A MI CORAZÒN....GRACIAS POR ILUMINAR CADA DÌA Y DARME LA ESPERANZA QUE LLEGARÀ UN TIEMPO MEJOR. FELIZ DÌA.

Lo podés encontrar en: descargasespirituales.wordpres ... omo-los-arboles (*Como los árboles)

Arbol luminoso
Arbol luminoso [fuente]

Juan Luis Guerra en el New York Times

The New York Times, July 18, 2008

The Sound of La Vida Dominicana

By SETH KUGEL, MIAMI

[Barbara P. Fernandez for The New York Times]
Juan Luis Guerra will perform at Madison Square Garden on Friday.
Barbara P. Fernandez for The New York Times
Juan Luis Guerra will perform at Madison Square Garden on Friday. [fuente]
nytimes.com/2008/07/18/arts/music/18guer.html

ON Friday evening the Dominican singer Juan Luis Guerra, the Latin Recording Academy’s 2007 man of the year, will take the stage for a Madison Square Garden concert fronting his 16-piece band, 3 back-up singers and 4 dancers. If past New York shows are any indication, the crowd will be electrified by his anthemic merengues on the developing world’s problems and charmed by his metaphor-laced love ballads, singing along with virtually every word. But in a sense they’ll be doing it all in secret.

That is because Mr. Guerra sings in Spanish, rendering his lyrics largely incomprehensible to many New Yorkers, including plenty who love socially conscious lyrics and appreciate a fine turn of phrase.

“I’d love to be more skilled in English, to get songs like ‘Ojalá que Llueva Café’ into English,” Mr. Guerra said, citing the song about rural poverty that vaulted him to fame in 1989. “I’d love it if Americans could understand Dominican culture, Dominican metaphors.”

It is a vexing musical problem. Diplomats speak through interpreters, books are translated, movies are subtitled. But music jumps language barriers more awkwardly: the catchall term “world music” is in most cases shorthand for “music whose lyrics we can’t understand.” Mr. Guerra may have plenty of non-Spanish-speaking admirers — his current tour includes stops in Stockholm and Amsterdam — who love him for his gentle voice, catchy melodies, booming brass section and beguiling tropical rhythms but who have little idea what the songs are about.

That wouldn’t be so much of a problem if Mr. Guerra’s songs were of the “Bésame Mucho” variety, which (in case you didn’t know) means “Kiss Me a Lot.” But with Mr. Guerra’s songs people are actually missing something.

In an interview in Miami, where his tour started last week, Mr. Guerra, who is bearded and 6 foot 6, recounted explaining his songs to his English teacher in New York. “The song that most caught her attention was ‘Ojalá que Llueva Café,’ ” he said. “After I explained it to her, she said: ‘Americans have to hear this song. Sooner or later, they have to hear this song.’ She told me I had to find someone to translate it.”

Easier said than done. The gist of the first verse is this:

May it rain coffee in the countryside.

Let a downpour of cassava and tea fall.

From the skies a drizzle of white cheese,

And to the south a mountain of watercress and honey.

But setting the translation to music and performing it in English would be a bit like creating a Swahili version of “Born in the U.S.A.” That is most true in what Mr. Guerra calls his “social merengues,” many of which have become anthems in Latin America. Though they are about health care, poverty and immigration, with lyrics that have brought many to tears, they play the neat trick of also being danceable party songs.

Take “Niágara en Bicicleta,” a depressing portrayal of public hospitals in the developing world, named for a Dominican phrase indicating a situation as hopelessly difficult as traversing Niagara Falls on a bicycle. The narrator faints and is rushed to an emergency room, where the receptionist listens to the lottery numbers, a nurse talks to him in language usually reserved for dogs, and there’s no electric power for an EKG. The chorus is classic Guerra: where irresistibly danceable lyrics mesh reality with fantasy.

Don’t tell me that the doctors left.

Don’t tell me you don’t have anesthesia.

Don’t tell me someone’s drunk the alcohol

And sewn the thread for stitches into a tablecloth.

Don’t tell me the forceps are lost,

That the stethoscope is off partying,

That The x-ray machine has burnt out

And the serum has been used to sweeten the coffee.

His love songs often take place in a metaphorical alternate universe: poppy flowers predict the future, butterflies dance with grains of salt, a dolphin paints a wave on a woman’s breast. Sometimes his lyrics have led to criticism. In “La Bilirrubina” lovesickness causes a man’s bilirubin levels to rise, a condition more likely caused by hepatitis or chemotherapy. “You sing it to a doctor,” Mr. Guerra said, “and they tell you things that make no poetic sense. Scientific sense, yes. Poetic sense, no.”

Several of his songs have been translated but always into languages that are more forgiving than English with rhymes and sentence structure. There’s a Portuguese version of “Burbujas de Amor” (“Bubbles of Love”), a sensual Guerra composition inspired by a passage in Julio Cortázar’s novel “Hopscotch” that became popular in Brazil after being recording by the singer Raimundo Fagner. But though Mr. Cortázar’s novel won a National Book Award when it was translated and published in the United States, it would be a challenge for an English speaker to keep the romance with a direct translation of Mr. Guerra’s lyrics:

I’d like to be a fish

So I could soak my nose in your fishbowl

And make bubbles of love everywhere.

On the rare occasions that Mr. Guerra composes in English, his signature quirks are present. In “Medicine for My Soul,” the original mostly English version of his latest album’s title track, “La Llave de Mi Corazón,” a Louisiana man calls a radio station for cultural advice on his love for a Dominican woman.

Should I go and visit her?

Should I learn a Spanish word?

Should I cry, should I face

Some political concerns?

Should I join a social club?

Should I peel a coconut?

Moving in, moving on, merengue, bachata y son.

It was his record label, EMI Televisa, that insisted on doing a mostly Spanish version, Mr. Guerra said, but he said he felt that the English version remains better. (The Spanish version won 2007 Latin Grammys for Best Song and Best Record.)

Understanding the words doesn’t keep a listener from enjoying a song of course. Mr. Guerra himself was an incurable Beatles fan growing up, and their use of harmony influences his arrangements to this day. But he didn’t get the lyrics.

“Never,” he said. “I never knew what they were saying until I was older. Not long ago I started studying the words of ‘Eleanor Rigby’ with my niece, and I finally understood the song. I used to sing it and have no idea what it was about.”

Escuchar temas: nytimes.com/2008/07/18/arts/music/18guer.html

Espectáculo de Piazzolla el 26 de Julio (Silvia Portillo)

sábado, 12 de julio de 2008 18:57
ESPECTACULO DE PIAZZOLLA

domingo, 20 de julio de 2008 16:10
ESPECTACULO DE PIAZZOLLA

Silvia Portillo

Humberto Barrios CANTA A PIAZOLLA
el 26 de Julio 2008
Humberto Barrios CANTA A PIAZOLLA
el 26 de Julio 2008

QUERIDO AUGUSTO:
TE ENVIO LOS DATOS DEL ESPECTACULO DE HUMBERTO Y UN NUEVO TEMA PARA ESCUCHAR. YA ESTAMOS EN LA ULTIMA SEMANA,ES EL PROXIMO SABADO. TE AGRADEZCO MUCHISIMO TU DEDICACION.
CARIÑOS!!
SILVIA

cantantehumbertobarrios.blogspot.com

youtube.com/user/humbertopbarrios

Dibujos Obstinados en Castex 3217, del 22 Julio al 4 Agosto (Pablo Di Masso)

martes, 15 de julio de 2008 15:40
Newsletter Aerolatino-Geba exclusiva para suscriptores, mié 16 julio 2008

Pablo Di Masso

Inviteishon...

Dibujos Obstinados en Castex 3217, del 22 Julio al 4 Agosto
Dibujos Obstinados en Castex 3217, del 22 Julio al 4 Agosto

Vintage Film Poster

Casablanca
1942, Warner Bros., U.S. scene card -- 11x14in. (28x35.6cm.), (A-)
Casablanca
1942, Warner Bros., U.S. scene card -- 11x14in. (28x35.6cm.), (A-) [fuente]
christies.com/LotFinder/lot_de ... bjectID=5013909

Price Realized
£1,188 ($2,445)
Estimate
£1,000 - £1,500 ($2,059 - $3,089)
Get a shipping estimate
Sale Information
Sale 5236
Vintage Film Posters
20 November 2007
London, South Kensington

Links:

Casablanca (1942): imdb.com/title/tt0034583

El Logotipo de Hoy

MAMMA MIA! THE MOVIE
MAMMA MIA! THE MOVIE

Coplita

Tus ojos despiden fuego
y queman con su pasión,
pero se apagan con el ruego
de un amante corazón.

Fuente:
Jorge M. Furt
Cancionero Popular Rioplatense: Lírica Gauchesca Tomo II
Alicante : Biblioteca Virtual Miguel de Cervantes, 2003
Edición digital basada en la de Buenos Aires, Imprenta y Casa Editora "Coni", 1925.
cervantesvirtual.com/servlet/S ... 91/p0000006.htm
[1995 (Buenos Aires y Córdoba)]

Imágenes de Salida

National Gallery of Art, 4th and Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, D.C.

Le Missionnaire, 1894
4-color lithograph on wove paper
sheet: 30.7 x 24 cm (12 1/16 x 9 7/16 in.)
Gift of The Atlas Foundation
1995.76.80
Le Missionnaire, 1894
4-color lithograph on wove paper
sheet: 30.7 x 24 cm (12 1/16 x 9 7/16 in.)
Gift of The Atlas Foundation
1995.76.80 [fuente]
nga.gov/fcgi-bin/timage_f?obje ... 919&image=21442

Arte al Dia Internacional, 14 de Junio de 2007 Newsletter semanal artealdia.com
EL SITIO RECOMENDADO antoniaguzman.com.ar/index.htm

Planes of Encounter/Planos de Encuentro
1999
21.5 x 30 inches
painting, watercolor on handmade paper
Planes of Encounter/Planos de Encuentro
1999
21.5 x 30 inches
painting, watercolor on handmade paper

Christie's, 16 July 2008

JOAN MIRO
Le caissier (D. 487)
etching, aquatint and carborundum in colors, 1969, on Chiffon de Mandeure, signed in pencil, numbered 67/75 (there were also a few artist's proofs), the full sheet, a few handling creases at the sheet edges, pale time staining (primarily along the right sheet edge), otherwise apparently in good condition, not examined out of the frame
S. 35½ x 27 in. (902 x 940 mm.)
JOAN MIRO
Le caissier (D. 487)
etching, aquatint and carborundum in colors, 1969, on Chiffon de Mandeure, signed in pencil, numbered 67/75 (there were also a few artist's proofs), the full sheet, a few handling creases at the sheet edges, pale time staining (primarily along the right sheet edge), otherwise apparently in good condition, not examined out of the frame
S. 35½ x 27 in. (902 x 940 mm.) [fuente]
christies.com/LotFinder/lot_de ... bjectID=5062981

Price Realized
$21,250
Estimate
$12,000 - $18,000
Sale Information
Sale 1990
Prints And Multiples
29 - 30 April 2008
New York, Rockefeller Plaza

Arte al Dia Internacional, 15 de Noviembre de 2007 Newsletter semanal artealdia.com
EL SITIO RECOMENDADO pablodimasso.com.ar

Pablo Di Masso
POLACOPOP
2008
29.7 x 42 cm
Pablo Di Masso
POLACOPOP
2008
29.7 x 42 cm
pablodimasso.com.ar

Le Figaro.fr 30 de Mayo de 2008 La lettre d'info du figaro
Enquêtes. Lacoste, les dents de la mode

THE NEW YORK TIMES, 18 JUNE 2008
Remembering Cyd Charisse

[Photo: Associated Press]
Cyd Charisse
The next year, 1953, she was dancing with Fred Astaire in "The Band Wagon," cast as a ballerina on Broadway.
Photo: Associated Press
Cyd Charisse
The next year, 1953, she was dancing with Fred Astaire in "The Band Wagon," cast as a ballerina on Broadway. [fuente]
nytimes.com/slideshow/2008/06/ ... CHARISSE_4.html

The New York Times, July 17, 2008

Marilynn K. Yee/The New York Times
/ “Let’s Get Tangled,” a piece by Jessy Smith, part of the SummerDANZ: Emerging Artists showcase at Dance Theater Workshop.
Marilynn K. Yee/The New York Times
/ “Let’s Get Tangled,” a piece by Jessy Smith, part of the SummerDANZ: Emerging Artists showcase at Dance Theater Workshop. [fuente]
nytimes.com/2008/07/17/arts/dance/17emer.html

THE NEW YORK SUN, 17 JULY 2008

[T A T E M O D E R N]
Cy Twombly, ‘Ferragosto V’ (1961).X
Until September 14 (Bankside, London, +44 (0) 20-7887-8888).
T A T E M O D E R N
Cy Twombly, ‘Ferragosto V’ (1961).X
Until September 14 (Bankside, London, +44 (0) 20-7887-8888).

Until September 14 (Bankside, London, +44 (0) 20-7887-8888).

THE NEW YORK SUN, 21 JULY 2008

[TO B I A S EV E R K E]
MUCH MORE THAN TREADING WATER More than 3,000 athletes took part in this year’s triathlon during yesterday’s extreme heat, including The New York Sun’s V.L. Hendrickson, who writes about her experience swimming, biking, and running around Manhattan on page 2. Also, coverage of an athlete who died during the event.
TO B I A S EV E R K E
MUCH MORE THAN TREADING WATER More than 3,000 athletes took part in this year’s triathlon during yesterday’s extreme heat, including The New York Sun’s V.L. Hendrickson, who writes about her experience swimming, biking, and running around Manhattan on page 2. Also, coverage of an athlete who died during the event.

THE NEW YORK SUN, 21 JULY 2008

[S PA N I E R M A N G A L L E RY]
PORTS AND HARBORS The Spanierman Gallery presents an exhibit of works by Emile Gruppe, a 20th-century American artist who painted the bustling boatyards and quiet sidewalks of Gloucester, Mass., as well as the rich autumnal landscapes of rural Vermont. Using vigorous impressionistic brushstrokes and a bold color spectrum to depict light reflecting off water and leaves, Gruppe conveys the lush but simple aesthetic of New England farms and fishing ports, as in “Busy Harbor, Gloucester” (c. 1950s), above. Through Saturday, August 30, Monday–Saturday, 9:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m., Spanierman Gallery, 45 E. 58th St. at Madison Avenue, 212-832-0208, free.
S PA N I E R M A N G A L L E RY
PORTS AND HARBORS The Spanierman Gallery presents an exhibit of works by Emile Gruppe, a 20th-century American artist who painted the bustling boatyards and quiet sidewalks of Gloucester, Mass., as well as the rich autumnal landscapes of rural Vermont. Using vigorous impressionistic brushstrokes and a bold color spectrum to depict light reflecting off water and leaves, Gruppe conveys the lush but simple aesthetic of New England farms and fishing ports, as in “Busy Harbor, Gloucester” (c. 1950s), above. Through Saturday, August 30, Monday–Saturday, 9:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m., Spanierman Gallery, 45 E. 58th St. at Madison Avenue, 212-832-0208, free.

TheatreDance.comChau!, nos vemos en Geba !